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Home Alumni In Memoriam

In Memoriam

Below please find those CRMS friends we have lost since January 2017. We have included obituaries when available. To share additional information please contact Nicole Padgett.
January 30, 1947 - November 16, 2018

Commitment to service marked Eric Richardson Calhoun's life. He spent it joyfully in dedication to his wife and children, the larger Richardson family, the Greensboro community, and a wide variety of organizations working for the greater good. From a young age he lived by a heartfelt code learned at Camp Agawam, whose principles were founded on the sense that one's life should be dedicated to acts of kindness and service to others. His life and achievements embodied that ethos, and while his work in this life is done, the impact he had on his family members, countless friends, and the world beyond live on. Eric passed away peacefully at the age of 71 on November 16, 2018 in Wilmington, North Carolina after spending six months fighting a degenerative neuromuscular disease. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Mary Sitterson Calhoun; his brother, John and Charlotte Calhoun; sister-in-law Sue Calhoun; his brothers-in-law Curtis Sitterson, Joe Sitterson and Lisa Nanney; his aunt Anne Carlson; and Mary and Eric's four children: Rich and Katie Calhoun, Carly Calhoun and Sam Despeaux, Nancy Calhoun and Brian Kilkelly, and Beda Calhoun and Gordon Klco; as well as four loving grandchildren, whom he adored, Gage, Ber, Sigrid and Boden Calhoun; and nine nieces and nephews. He has been predeceased by his parents Newton Sudduth Calhoun and Beda Carlson Calhoun, and his brother, David Calhoun. Eric was born in Charlotte, North Carolina on January 30th, 1947 and spent his childhood with his older twin brothers, John and David, in Connecticut. He graduated from The Hotchkiss School in 1965, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1970. He then married Mary Howard Sitterson, and they began their married life by packing up their Jeepster and heading West. They made a home in Jackson, WY and spent several years exploring the mountains, forming a bond with the place and friends that would last his lifetime. They returned to North Carolina where Eric earned his MLA in Landscape Architecture from NC State University before settling in Greensboro, where they raised their four children. Eric dedicated his forty-year professional career to Richardson Properties, twenty years of which he served as president and CEO, leading and growing the company before retiring in 2015. In addition, he acted as vice chairman of Piedmont Trust. He was deeply committed to many organizations, serving in leadership roles for the Greensboro Science Center, Greensboro Day School, Greensboro Farmers Curb Market, Family Service of the Piedmont, Piedmont Land Conservancy, Center for Creative Leadership, Colorado Rocky Mountain School, and Camp Agawam. His good-heartedness and wry humor accompanied him through the well-trod routes of his favorite places, be they barbeque joints or boards of directors. In his empty nest adult life, his annual walkabouts explored open country: hiking the depths of the Grand Canyon, slot canyons and red rocks of the American Southwest; driving in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado; and most recently returning to New Zealand, a place of his early adulthood, with his wife, Mary. His was a life lived well, full of friendship and love, and an enduring commitment to making the world a better place.
April 25, 1940 - August 31, 2018

Edwin “Ed” Marston, a physicist turned environmental journalist and political organizer, died Aug. 31 in Grand Junction, Colorado, of complications of West Nile virus. He was 78 years old. He is survived by his wife and working partner, Betsy Marston, of Paonia, Colorado.

Ed Marston was born April 25, 1940, in New York to Jack and Matilda Marston, both European immigrants. He graduated from New York’s competitive Stuyvesant High School in 1958, and from the City College of New York in 1961. He earned his doctorate in solid-state physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1968.

In 1966, Marston married Elizabeth “Betsy” Pilat, a public television producer, in New York. The couple had two children and lived in the tri-state area. During this period, Marston worked as an assistant professor of physics at Queens College of New York, and then as an associate professor of physics at Ramapo College of New Jersey. His textbook for non-physics college students, The Dynamic Environment, was published during his teaching career.

In 1974, the Marstons and their two children Wendy, aged 4, and David, aged 2, moved across the country to Paonia, Colorado, a coal mining and orchard town of 1,400 people below the mountains where the family had built a summer cabin. The plan was to take a year off, but just months into the year, the Marstons started the weekly North Fork Times, and he never returned to the field of physics. The Marstons sold their first paper in 1980, and in 1982 founded an environmental paper to cover the western slope of Colorado, the Western Colorado Report. In 1983, they folded that publication into the bi-weekly High Country News, which covered environmental issues primarily in Colorado, Wyoming, Nevada, Arizona, and Utah, as well as the entire western United States.

Marston became publisher of High Country News, which continues to cover the West for its 35,000 subscribers who live all over the country. His wife, Betsy Marston, was his partner in all journalistic ventures. He held that writing and administrative post for 19 years until 2002, when he retired.

As the publisher of High Country News, Marston received the prestigious George Polk award for journalism in 1986 for the series “Western Water Made Simple,” which was later published as a book. In 1990, the University of Colorado, Boulder, awarded him its first Wallace Stegner Award “for faithfully and evocatively depicting the spirit of the American West.”

Marston wrote and published pieces that helped define the American West. These included an interview with Floyd Dominy, the chief of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Reclamation; an analysis of the amenity economy; and a profile of progressive ranchers that brought conservation and agriculture together.

Marston was always involved in public life, serving for 18 years on the elected Delta-Montrose Electric Association co-op board, as well as terms with volunteer boards including Delta County Economic Development, Paonia Chamber of Commerce, Solar Energy International, and the Blue Sage Community Art Center. In 2008, he and his wife were named “Champions of the Rockies,” an honor given by Colorado College as part of its State of the Rockies annual report.

Marston was a fierce defender of the West’s birthright of public lands and a generous mentor with young and emerging writers. Many of the writers Marston worked with went on to brilliant careers in journalism and public service.

Marston was a burr in the side of the U.S. Forest Service during the 1990s. One of his notable editorials was headlined: “It’s time to clear-cut the Forest Service.” He was also a commercial developer of Paonia’s two-block downtown and a fierce opponent of anyone — no matter how well funded and powerful — who used political influence to try to close off access to wilderness. Between 2012 and 2015, Marston fought a drawn-out battle with billionaire Bill Koch, who tried to use a congressional land swap to block public access to the Raggeds Wilderness and its elk herd. Ultimately Marston blocked Koch.

Marston is survived by his wife of 52 years, Betsy, who lives in Paonia; daughter Wendy Lehmann and her husband Benjamin Lehmann, and their children Maude and Bruno; and son David Marston and his wife, Edel Clarke, and their daughter Sorcha, all of New York. His also leaves his sister, Ann Rock, of Florida; and cousin Steve Lidofsky and his wife, Lis, of Vermont.

Marston was known to be engaged and curious about issues, politics, and people. He had definite, well-informed ideas about the correct way to do things and was an energetic ally and a formidable foe in local and regional disputes. He loved to think about how to solve problems, and although he found Delta County frustrating in many ways, he loved working with local government, organizations, and citizens to make changes. Marston thrived on conversation and was never shy about asking people about their lives. He also belonged to a book club that he found stretched his mind.

A city kid who grew up in Queens, New York, and worked as a bicycle Good Humor ice cream vendor during the summers, Marston said that rural life brought out the best of him. He was an avid hiker and cross-country skier and appreciated living close to the natural world. Most of all, he was grateful that he and his family chose, 44 years ago, to make a leap of faith and settle in the small town of Paonia, a place Marston protected, agitated and cherished.

May 3, 1950 - August 10, 2018

Ellen LeCompte, 68, died August 10 from a fall in her home in Lawrence, Kansas. Born in Colorado Springs, Colorado to Oliver and Janet LeCompte, the second of six children, Ellie grew up in that city, attending local public schools and later the Colorado Springs School for Girls before transferring to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, where she graduated in 1968. Ellie thrived in the alternative school's iconoclastic atmosphere, where students helped operate the school's farm and build barns.
Ellie attended Pitzer College in Claremont, California and the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah before completing her undergraduate work at Colorado College in Colorado Springs. She held various jobs during and after her college studies, including teaching English at the Technical Vocational Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico and working in administration for the Colorado Springs Symphony.

Ultimately deciding on a career as a psychologist, she entered the psychology program at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, receiving her Ph.D. She spent the rest of her life working in Topeka and Lawrence as a practicing therapist.

She lived life to the fullest, but of all her passions, her love of animals stands out, especially the love of her standard poodles. From childhood on, she was always surrounded by high-spirited poodles: Rachel, Mitch, Wiley, Jannie and dozens more; two, three and even four at a time. Their intelligence and charm delighted her. When one of her poodles disdained ball-chasing, she translated its attitude: "Chasing balls? That's for dumb dogs!"

She was known for her generosity, offering her time and treasure to a multitude of causes. She sometimes rescued injured animals on the roadside, unhesitatingly funding the huge veterinary bills needed to restore the creature's health.

Ellie's vivacious personality filled any room, drawing people to her. More than a few of her friends and family, not to mention her patients, could say she had rescued them. She will be sorely missed.

She was married twice and had no children. She leaves behind four siblings, Jenny Anderson of Berthoud, Colorado; Charles LeCompte of Brookline, Massachusetts; Tom LeCompte of Sharon, Massachusetts; and Peter LeCompte of Walanae, Hawaii.
September 6, 1947 - June 18, 2018

Margaret McClintock Graham, a former director of the Tomales Village Community Services District who helped run Mostly Natives nursery for over 30 years, died last June in a car accident in Colorado. She was 70 years old.

Margaret is remembered by many in West Marin as a warm, straightforward friend and dedicated member of her community. Her husband, Walter Earle, said she was the bravest woman he ever knew.

That bravery manifested itself in myriad ways: trips that spanned the globe when she was a student in college, a move to an unfamiliar coast, a willingness to engage with a goodhearted stranger. When a tree came down in her neighbor’s driveway, she was the first to come over, chainsaw in hand. Once, in her youth, during a party at the mansion of Colorado Governor Richard Lamb, Margaret observed well-heeled guests making a mess of the floor’s white carpets and asked the governor if she could go barefoot in his home. He laughed and told her he would be honored.

Margaret’s curiosity led her to be knowledgeable about a range of topics, and she loved the natural world in particular. “When you talked to Margaret, you had a good time,” her friend and neighbor Sara Duskin said. “You left feeling you’d had a good conversation, whether it was about her lavender plants or a political issue or where she’d been hiking.”

Margaret was born on Sept. 6, 1947, in Denver, Colo. to Charles Andrew Graham and Jean Charters Graham. Mr. Graham was a Yale-educated lawyer and Mrs. Graham a professor of political science at the University of Denver who later worked for Gov. Lamb choosing judicial appointments for the state’s courts.

Both of Margaret’s parents were involved in Democratic politics and held fundraisers for various candidates, including Tim Worth and David Skaggs. Margaret had two older siblings, Andy and Judy, both of whom have passed on.

After attending the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, a boarding school near Aspen, Margaret went off to Barnard College in New York City. But she found the city far too noisy, left after a year, and matriculated to Friends World College, a Quaker school that allowed her to get an education all over the world.

As part of her program in cultural anthropology, Margaret travelled to the Middle East, India, Nepal, Kenya and Japan. She hitchhiked in Afghanistan and learned how to navigate a Volkswagen bus through streets lined with sleeping drunks in Kenya. She graduated in 1972 and arrived in West Marin soon after.

Margaret’s first home in Marin was in Point Reyes Station, in a house on the mesa owned by a friend of hers from Colorado. The natural beauty appealed to her; in addition to loving flora and fauna, Margaret was an avid hiker.

While in Point Reyes Station, Margaret was briefly married to Richard Wiltermood and had a son, Rishi. When her friend sold the house on the mesa, Margaret purchased a 1957 Chevy school bus and parked it on a friend’s property in Marshall. She lived there for a number of years with Rishi in tow.

“It was a school bus from Shasta County, so it was one of those shorter, squat ones designed for skinny little country roads,” Mr. Earle said. Margaret had just moved out of the bus and into an old chicken coop she had fixed up on a property across the street when the two met.

Margaret first encountered Mr. Earle in 1981, thanks to dead fish and a good sense of humor. At the time, both were employed by the Department of Fish and Game. Margaret was working for the wardens, ensuring that fish buyers were not swindling fishermen. Mr. Earle was in charge of sampling fish to determine the herring spawn count.

One day, while he was picking out fish to sample, a co-worker yelled that he was turning on the offloading machine—implying that a boatload of fish was about to fall on Mr. Earle. He quickly jumped aside, only to realize that the other man had been joking. Relieved to find himself fish-free, Mr. Earle started laughing—a reaction that endeared him to Margaret.

“I looked over and saw this woman, and she was smiling, and she came over and said, ‘I just figured you’d be mad when he did that, but you laughed!’” Mr. Earle remembered.

Margaret was intrigued by the work the men were doing, and soon after she became Mr. Earle’s new partner, both in life and in the fish sampling business. They were married on Oct. 9, 1982, and had a son, Kris, in 1984.

In 1983, Margaret and Mr. Earle decided they wanted to do something with a piece of property they had purchased in Tomales.

While Mr. Earle had worked as a gardener and landscaper, Margaret initially protested, saying she didn’t know anything about plants. But she quickly learned, and when Mostly Natives opened off of Highway 1 in 1984, she was in the thick of it, growing the nursery’s supply of native shrubbery.

Nancy Shine, who worked at Mostly Natives for 25 years, remembers Margaret teaching her the names of the native plants and the many ways to care for them. “She liked plants that were shrubs, and trees and grasses—she wasn’t so much into the flowering plants,” Ms. Shine said. She used to tease Margaret that she unduly enjoyed deadheading (the process of removing dead flowers from a plant) because it allowed her to attack the flowers.

While some might find it difficult to work alongside one’s spouse day after day for three decades, Mr. Earle said he had always found it a pleasure. “She was super curious about everything,” he said. “She was good at customer service and answering people’s questions.” Eventually, however, the amount of time and energy expended on the business became too much for the couple, and they sold it last year.

Margaret was “a big personality in Tomales,” Ms. Duskin said. At various points in time, she was involved in a host of community organizations in town, including the Marin/Sonoma Mosquito and Vector Control District, the Tomales Village Community Services District and the Tomales Emergency Response Network. She was also involved in the creation and maintenance of the downtown park.

Both friends and family spoke to her ability to truly be present, both in the community and in her personal interactions. “When you went into the nursery she was so there,” Ms. Duskin said. “She always put down what she was doing and would ask you about yourself.”

Her son Kris agreed, saying that his mother’s presence in his life had been a sweet and steadying constant.

“She was never not there, never afraid to tell me flat out what I needed to hear,” he said. “She was just there, and that’s the part I’ll miss the most.”

Margaret is survived by her husband, Walter, sons Rishi and Kris, and granddaughter, Anika.
July 7, 1929 - Aug. 8, 2018

Here’s what we wrote on Facebook:
Charlie was the son of Steve Shanzer, who greatly influenced the art/silversmithing program at CRMS. At the start of WW2 Charlie and his sister, Doris, were on the last children's refugee boat to sail from Marseilles to Australia where they lived with adoptive parents for the duration of the war. After the war, Charlie came to the US and in 1949 came to Aspen. In 1951 he persuaded Steve, who at that time had been living in New York, to move to Aspen. In 1953 Steve, at the age of 64, was hired by John & Anne Holden to teach French, German and silversmithing at CRMS. He introduced fold-boats to the students, too! Charlie says in his book (Escape Home) "In the 1960s I designed a 'jewelry hogan' at CRMS to my father's specifications." Charlie was a frequent visitor to the school throughout the 60s & 70s and even accompanied Steve and students on several spring trips. In 2013 Charlie published Escape Home: Rebuilding a Life after the Anschluss, which chronicled his father's life as well as his own.

https://www.aspentimes.com/news/local/charles-paterson-founder-of-aspen-iconic-boomerang-lodge-dies/
 September 9, 1986 – May 20, 2018

Michael Joseph Colangelo III, of Huntington Station, died on Sunday, May 20 at age 31.

Beloved husband of Katherine (Berger). Survived by his mother and father Ellen (Reynolds) and Michael Colangelo II.  Colangelo was an NYPD officer assigned to the Canine Unit.
October 1, 1929 - April 14, 2018

George William Stricker passed away on April 14, 2018 after a brief illness. He is survived by two brothers, Jim and Dave, four children, Cynthia, Peter (Cevin), Brian (Julia), and Scott (Sheila), three grandchildren, Leianna, Keoki, and Josh, and two great grandchildren, Isiaiah and Maleia. He is also survived by a world of dear friends.

George was born in The Pas, Manitoba, Canada on October 1, 1929 to American parents. He was raised in Minneapolis, MN where he attended the Blake School; he went on to earn a BA and an MBA at Stanford University, graduating in 1953. Subsequently, he joined the Air Force and met Rolleen Taylor in San Antonio TX. They married soon after, lived in Del Rio TX (where their first child, Cynthia was born), moved to Albuquerque NM, and then to Carbondale CO in 1958 where their three sons were born.

The Stricker family lived on the banks of the Crystal River fly fishing, raising animals, and spending their summers backpacking in the Rockies and the Canyonlands of Utah. As the family was sitting around a campfire under a mountain peak somewhere, George was known to ask the rhetorical question, “Where would you rather be?”.

George worked as the business manager and taught history at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School and later became the Director of Adult Education at the newly founded Colorado Mountain College. The family moved to Gig Harbor WA in 1975 where George ran the adult education program at the University of Puget Sound.

In 1980, his career track took a radical turn into the wind energy field. George was intrigued by renewable energy and became a self-taught developer which took him to Colorado, Hawaii, the Cook Islands, India, China, and various parts of California. George explored the world, living in Europe, Seattle, Palm Springs, and Tehachapi.

In 1995, George retired from the wind business and moved to South Lake Tahoe CA where his son, Brian lived. Not content with golf or taking cruises, he bought a lodge on 20 acres of forest land in the Hope Valley surrounded by the high Sierras, and created a retreat center. During the seven years he owned the property, he hosted numerous weddings, mediation retreats, and sweat lodge ceremonies. In 2006, George moved to the Chesapeake Bay where he bought a house on a small inlet. In 2011, he moved to Austin TX to be close to Cynthia and Scott. Not one to sit idle, George became a volunteer at Barton Hills Elementary School, mentored a boy, and volunteered with Hospice Austin to help terminally-ill people navigate the dying process.

George was an empathic listener and an incorrigible story-teller who always had a joke or a pun available for his captive audience. He was a master at helping others feel loved and cared for and lived true to his mantra, “KEEP SMILING”.

In his own words, George said, “If I am remembered very long, maybe it will be for something I represented rather than for my character or personality, something like: ‘Here’s lies a kind person’, or ‘George always tried to help,’ or ‘The world would be better off if more were like him’, or some similar sort of epitaph. My writing will not be published. My art will not be collected. My woodwork will crumble. But maybe my smile will be passed on and light the eyes of others… Maybe the children I knew will become doctors, professors, clergy-persons, inventors, artists, statesmen, or others who can nudge civilization along an evolutionary path toward greatness. Who could ask for more?”

The family is eternally grateful to the staff of Barton Hills Assisted Living. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice Austin.

May 27, 1936 - March 20, 2018

Mary Beil Gerdeman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the daughter of Elizabeth Lee Beil and Wallace Beil, an ophthalmologist. Mary’s early childhood with her older sister, Betty, was spent in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her favorite memories of this time are from Mississippi where her family bought their first horses and learned horsemanship while riding near a family cottage.

As a teenager, Mary moved to Upper Gallinas Canyon near Montezuma, New Mexico where her parents bought a mountain ranch for Tennessee Walkers and Morgan horses. Mary and her sister, Judy, rode often through the Sangre de Cristo mountains while living on the Lazy B Ranch, later renamed El Porvenir Ranch. Mary attended school in nearby Las Vegas. Her senior year, Mary and her horse moved to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado where she was one of 2 members of the inaugural graduating class in 1954. Her younger sister, Judy, graduated from CRMS as well eight years later.

While attending Highland College in Las Vegas, she met her husband, James Gerdeman. She married Jimmy in 1958, and the couple moved to Austin where she completed her BA in German and Jimmy completed his law degree at the University of Texas. Following graduation, the two moved to Lubbock, Texas where they raised their three daughters. Jimmy ran a law practice and Mary worked for him as a legal secretary. When their daughters were older, Mary accepted a job as a secretary at Texas Tech University.

After Mary and Jimmy divorced in 1981, she started a career in Medical Records. She attended South Plains College and earned an Accredited Records Technician certificate in 1985. She returned to Texas Tech as a medical transcriptionist until her retirement in 1999.

In Lubbock, Mary enjoyed museums, the symphony, weaving, and Texas Tech football. As some of her long-time friends left the area, she considered a move to be closer to family.

In 2004, Mary moved to San Diego near her daughter Amanda’s family. She lived in the Seven Oaks Community of Rancho Bernardo and was an active participant with the RB Travel Club, the Continuing Education Center, and the Daytrippers. With travel club friends, she saw sights across California and traveled to Alaska, New England, Hawaii and Nashville. She loved books, chamber music, opera, and the symphony as well as the San Diego Museum of Art.

Since March 2017, Mary has enjoyed life with new friends at the Belmont Village where she was a regular at the musical performances, trivia, word games, and lectures.
November 28, 1955 - December 21, 2017

Christopher Wylie Link son of M.P. Link Jr. and Elizabeth C. Link.

Chris is survived by his sons, Marshall Link and Tucker Link; their mother Amy Link; his brother Douglas Link; his nieces, Mona Ohmart and Jennifer Link; nephew, Peter Link; grandnephew, Gus Colby and grand nieces, Faith Ohmart and Lena Colby.

Chris was a farmer, carpenter, cabinet and furniture maker, real estate agent, musician, and guitar collector extraordinaire. He was a man of many talents and interests; a student of history, language, culture, and human nature; a lover of books, animals, and the great outdoors. He was an avid camper, hiker, and supporter of environmental organizations.

Christopher will be sorely missed by his family and long-time wide circle of friends. His empathy, compassion, and sparkling sense of humor, along with his razor-sharp intellect, will not be forgotten.
April 18, 1933 - November 10, 2017

Ed Rubovits died unexpectedly the morning of November 10. He was sitting in the sunshine on the portal of his Santa Fe home, having just split a few logs. His wife of 53 years was with him. Ed had retired from a long career in education which included years of serving as headmaster of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, the Verde Valley School in Sedona, Arizona and as head of the upper school of Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon. He was a strong advocate of outdoor and experiential education, and he was an early supporter and organizer of the Portland chapter of Amigos de las Americas. Known for his wry sense of humor, his leadership style often brought perspective to difficult situations. Ed was happiest when he was skiing, hiking, and camping in the mountains or on his bike. In recent years he focused his love of the out of doors on cycling. He enjoyed many tours with Cycle Oregon and participating in school bike trips with students and colleagues. His idea of how to kick off retirement was the solo bicycle trip he took from Missoula, Montana to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Many years ago his infectious biking enthusiasm spread to his wife and his two small sons during a year they spent in France exploring the French countryside on their bicycles. Following his retirement in the mid-'90's Ed and Nancy discovered the Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route across Spain, and they developed an ongoing attachment to it. They made four trips to the Camino and were fortunate to travel the 500-mile route both on bikes and on foot and to spend time in a pilgrims' refuge as volunteer hospitaleros greeting and hosting others traveling the route. Ed's passing leaves uncountable friends and family who will miss him dearly. He is survived by his wife, Nancy and sons, Michael and David Rubovits and their spouses, Bronwen Lodato and Piper Davis, and by Ed's beloved granddaughter, Una Rubovits. He is also survived by his brother-in-law and sister-in-law Rick and Marilyn Hyde and by his nephew and nieces, Jeff, Katie, and Kristen Hyde. Ed said more than once, "we have had wonderful adventures and great good fortune." Donations to his memory may be made to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Carbondale, Colorado.
July 10, 1944 — October 30, 2017

She is survived by her husband of 32 years, Mark Luttrell; her sons Adam Infascelli of Glenwood Springs and Aaron Luttrell of Carbondale; her two sisters Janice Nuckols of Kaneohe, Hawaii, and Nora Nuckols of Vancouver, British Columbia; her two aunts and an uncle in Willimantic, Conn.; nieces, nephews and cousins; as well as many, many good friends.

Maureen was born in Kingsville, Texas, went to high school in Marietta, Ohio, and earned her R.N. from Good Samaritan Hospital in Zanesville, Ohio. She then went on to earn a B.S.N. from the University of Cincinnati and an M.S.N. from the University of Massachusetts. She moved from Boston to Glenwood Springs with her then-husband Joe Infascelli and began nursing at Valley View Hospital in 1975. She moved to Carbondale for the first time to become the residential school nurse and health educator for Colorado Rocky Mountain School.

Maureen later attended the University of Denver, where she earned her master's degree in counseling before returning to Carbondale, where she established her own counseling practice. She then worked a stint at the Advocate Safehouse in Glenwood Springs before Maureen began teaching nursing at Colorado Mountain College. She retired as a professor of nursing in 2011, although she continued to teach clinical and skills labs as adjunct faculty until 2014.

Maureen was committed to the Roaring Fork Women's Triathlon team for 18 years, serving as a coach in various roles, and was just named coach emeritus this summer. She competed Aug. 4, 2017, in the Tri For The Cure in Denver, finishing with her best time in three years. She was also a member of the Tri-Glenwood 30-year club.

After her multiple myeloma diagnosis seven years ago, she was a vibrant member of the Cancer Coffee Walk & Talk group at Valley View Hospital. Maureen loved to give back to the community, most recently serving as a volunteer with the Rosiebelle Art Project, as well as the Carbondale Library Wednesday after-school art program. She was an annual volunteer at Carbondale Mountain Fair as the pie judge, always in a memorable costume. She was also very active in the Carbondale Methodist Church. She provided babysitting, dogsitting and respite care for many of her friends.

Essentially, wherever there was a need, Maureen was there. Maureen was loved and will be remembered by many. She spent 30 years as a volunteer fireman and EMT for the Carbondale Fire Department, so a celebration of her life was held at the firehouse on Sunday, Dec. 3.
February 12, 1990 - October 8, 2017

Having lived for 27 years with the great joy and spirit that was Hayden Kennedy, we share the loss of our son and his partner Inge Perkins as the result of an avalanche in the southern Madison Mountains near Bozeman, Montana, on October 7th.

Inge Perkin’s body was recovered by the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center at the base of Mt. Imp on October 9th. Hayden survived the avalanche but not the unbearable loss of his partner in life. He chose to end his life. Myself and his mother Julie sorrowfully respect his decision.

Hayden truly was an uncensored soul whose accomplishments as a mountaineer were always secondary to his deep friendships and mindfulness.

He recently moved to Bozeman to work on his EMT certification while Inge completed her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and education at Montana State University.

“Over the last few years, however, as I’ve watched too many friends go to the mountains only to never return, I’ve realized something painful,” wrote Hayden in Evening Sends just last month. “It’s not just the memorable summits and crux moves that are fleeting. Friends and climbing partners are fleeting, too. This is the painful reality of our sport, and I’m unsure what to make of it. Climbing is either a beautiful gift or a curse.”
June 6, 1940 - August 25, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017

Don Harvey passed away peacefully May 5, 2017, at his home surrounded by family. Don was born in Montreal, Canada and was raised in Spokane, Washington. He graduated from Whitman College and then went to McGill University in Montreal for medical school, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Don performed his residency at Southern Pacific Hospital in San Francisco where he chose the specialty of Urology.

Don met the love of his life, Jane Mildred Hasfurther, in first grade. They dated through high school and college and were married in 1955. Don and Jane chose to live in Lucas Valley, California, which provided an ideal setting to raise their four boys. They had a rich and full life together, enjoying sailing on the San Francisco Bay, traveling with friends, and family vacations. Every year the family had wonderful vacations at the beach in Bolinas, on the delta at Tinsley Island and, of course, at their beloved Spirit Lake in Idaho. Five generations of Harveys have vacationed at Spirit Lake. Don and Jane spent six months at the lake every year after Don's retirement in 1999.

Don had a distinguished career in medicine. He was a fine surgeon who truly cared about his patients. He enjoyed getting to know them as people and learning about their families and lives. Don served as President of the Marin Medical Society and Commodore of the San Francisco Yacht Club.

Don loved his projects. He restored nautical antiques and wooden speedboats. But his favorite project was expanding the cabins at Spirit Lake so all his children and grandchildren could gather together every summer.

Don is survived by his wife Jane, sons David, Kent, Philip, and Peter and 10 grandchildren.

Published in Spokesman-Review on May 21, 2017
May 13, 1937 - January 21, 2017

Tony Perry died Jan. 21 peacefully in his beloved Colorado home in the arms of his loving family.

To find words to summarize Tony's life is daunting, as he accomplished so much. He was a complex man, memorable and loved.

He was born May 13, 1937, in Greenwich, Connecticut, the son of Margaret and Parker Perry, and spent his early years in Stowe and Manchester, Vermont. He followed his heart to the mountains of Colorado at 16 to a newly organized Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale. This environment nurtured his independent, adventuresome character, where he worked, skied, traveled and earned a ski scholarship to The University of Denver, excelling at athletics and hotel management. He struggled with dyslexia and became very adept at recognizing the skills he lacked, surrounding himself with capable people to help him accomplish his goals. He went on to help others with this affliction to follow a successful path.

A born entrepreneur, his charm, and interest in people drew him to the hospitality business soon after college. After a short stint in the Colorado National Guard, he opened nightclubs in New York, Stowe and Manchester, Vermont, and later turned his attention to the restaurant business. The Sirloin Saloons, Dakotas, Sweetwaters, Perry's Fish House - all institutions representing beauty, fun, great food and lasting memories for the millions who entered their doors.

During the four decades that he ran his many restaurants throughout the Northeast, he employed thousands of people through The Perry Restaurant Group and evolved a management style that was years ahead of its time. He took a deep and abiding interest in the people he worked with, recognizing that by giving them the opportunity to grow and succeed as individuals, their contribution to the business would develop. He put in place an employee stock ownership plan in the 1980s where all employees could benefit; he sent people on courses that helped them empower their lives rather than just their jobs, and he developed an inclusive style of management that engendered immense loyalty to this day.

He supported generously many causes close to his heart - he educated countless children, supported green start-ups, wildlife conservation, The Vermont Land Trust, Nature's Conservancy, music and the arts.

He was a born seeker and adventurer, traveling to over 50 countries, often bringing along his friends and family to share his experiences. He heli-skied throughout the Canadian Rockies, he was an avid fisherman and hunter, at home in the woods as anywhere. He raised a herd of majestic buffalo on his hilltop farm in Vermont with sweeping views of Lake Champlain from his rustic log cabin he built around an apple tree.

He amassed a matrix of friends as diverse as his interests, most who he remained connected to throughout his life. He had a genuine and lasting impact on so many, freely giving love, support and confidence where he felt he was needed. So many thought of him as their best friend.

Tony was profoundly connected to nature and beauty. His love and appreciation of the Native American culture and art form was a passion that brought him endless pleasure.

He was tireless in his quest for the meaning of life, periodically trading his business work for his spiritual journey, moving to an ashram for a time to find fulfillment and love. His pursuit led him to his soul mate, and he and Teri were married in 1995.

For 22 years, they traveled and skied and fly-fished around the world. They built wonderful homes in Colorado, Mexico, and Nantucket, and mostly they enjoyed their transcendent love for each other every day.

His sanctuary was his Colorado mountain ranch, high in the wildflowers, where he built his "Stonehenge" as a legacy. However, his true legacy will last for eternity in the lives that have been altered by his love.

Tony was spiritual, funny, loving and so immeasurably generous.

He lived and died with unequaled courage undaunted by his illnesses, and full of gratitude.

He leaves behind a world enriched by his presence. He is survived by his sister, Judy Perry Rowe, and his nieces, Wendy, Jane and Jenny, his stepson Kenan, Miya and his wonderful grandchildren, Jack, Eliza and Sebastian, who brought special joy to his later years. His extended family is too numerous to mention, but no less important - forever connected in love. Not left behind, but traveling beside him for eternity is his adoring wife, Teri Giguere Perry.

Please honor nature in memory of Tony. We have set up a website online at www.tonyperry.life to share memories, photos, and information about his services.

Alumni

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In Memoriam

Below please find those CRMS friends we have lost since January 2017. We have included obituaries when available. To share additional information please contact Nicole Padgett.
January 30, 1947 - November 16, 2018

Commitment to service marked Eric Richardson Calhoun's life. He spent it joyfully in dedication to his wife and children, the larger Richardson family, the Greensboro community, and a wide variety of organizations working for the greater good. From a young age he lived by a heartfelt code learned at Camp Agawam, whose principles were founded on the sense that one's life should be dedicated to acts of kindness and service to others. His life and achievements embodied that ethos, and while his work in this life is done, the impact he had on his family members, countless friends, and the world beyond live on. Eric passed away peacefully at the age of 71 on November 16, 2018 in Wilmington, North Carolina after spending six months fighting a degenerative neuromuscular disease. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Mary Sitterson Calhoun; his brother, John and Charlotte Calhoun; sister-in-law Sue Calhoun; his brothers-in-law Curtis Sitterson, Joe Sitterson and Lisa Nanney; his aunt Anne Carlson; and Mary and Eric's four children: Rich and Katie Calhoun, Carly Calhoun and Sam Despeaux, Nancy Calhoun and Brian Kilkelly, and Beda Calhoun and Gordon Klco; as well as four loving grandchildren, whom he adored, Gage, Ber, Sigrid and Boden Calhoun; and nine nieces and nephews. He has been predeceased by his parents Newton Sudduth Calhoun and Beda Carlson Calhoun, and his brother, David Calhoun. Eric was born in Charlotte, North Carolina on January 30th, 1947 and spent his childhood with his older twin brothers, John and David, in Connecticut. He graduated from The Hotchkiss School in 1965, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1970. He then married Mary Howard Sitterson, and they began their married life by packing up their Jeepster and heading West. They made a home in Jackson, WY and spent several years exploring the mountains, forming a bond with the place and friends that would last his lifetime. They returned to North Carolina where Eric earned his MLA in Landscape Architecture from NC State University before settling in Greensboro, where they raised their four children. Eric dedicated his forty-year professional career to Richardson Properties, twenty years of which he served as president and CEO, leading and growing the company before retiring in 2015. In addition, he acted as vice chairman of Piedmont Trust. He was deeply committed to many organizations, serving in leadership roles for the Greensboro Science Center, Greensboro Day School, Greensboro Farmers Curb Market, Family Service of the Piedmont, Piedmont Land Conservancy, Center for Creative Leadership, Colorado Rocky Mountain School, and Camp Agawam. His good-heartedness and wry humor accompanied him through the well-trod routes of his favorite places, be they barbeque joints or boards of directors. In his empty nest adult life, his annual walkabouts explored open country: hiking the depths of the Grand Canyon, slot canyons and red rocks of the American Southwest; driving in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado; and most recently returning to New Zealand, a place of his early adulthood, with his wife, Mary. His was a life lived well, full of friendship and love, and an enduring commitment to making the world a better place.
April 25, 1940 - August 31, 2018

Edwin “Ed” Marston, a physicist turned environmental journalist and political organizer, died Aug. 31 in Grand Junction, Colorado, of complications of West Nile virus. He was 78 years old. He is survived by his wife and working partner, Betsy Marston, of Paonia, Colorado.

Ed Marston was born April 25, 1940, in New York to Jack and Matilda Marston, both European immigrants. He graduated from New York’s competitive Stuyvesant High School in 1958, and from the City College of New York in 1961. He earned his doctorate in solid-state physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1968.

In 1966, Marston married Elizabeth “Betsy” Pilat, a public television producer, in New York. The couple had two children and lived in the tri-state area. During this period, Marston worked as an assistant professor of physics at Queens College of New York, and then as an associate professor of physics at Ramapo College of New Jersey. His textbook for non-physics college students, The Dynamic Environment, was published during his teaching career.

In 1974, the Marstons and their two children Wendy, aged 4, and David, aged 2, moved across the country to Paonia, Colorado, a coal mining and orchard town of 1,400 people below the mountains where the family had built a summer cabin. The plan was to take a year off, but just months into the year, the Marstons started the weekly North Fork Times, and he never returned to the field of physics. The Marstons sold their first paper in 1980, and in 1982 founded an environmental paper to cover the western slope of Colorado, the Western Colorado Report. In 1983, they folded that publication into the bi-weekly High Country News, which covered environmental issues primarily in Colorado, Wyoming, Nevada, Arizona, and Utah, as well as the entire western United States.

Marston became publisher of High Country News, which continues to cover the West for its 35,000 subscribers who live all over the country. His wife, Betsy Marston, was his partner in all journalistic ventures. He held that writing and administrative post for 19 years until 2002, when he retired.

As the publisher of High Country News, Marston received the prestigious George Polk award for journalism in 1986 for the series “Western Water Made Simple,” which was later published as a book. In 1990, the University of Colorado, Boulder, awarded him its first Wallace Stegner Award “for faithfully and evocatively depicting the spirit of the American West.”

Marston wrote and published pieces that helped define the American West. These included an interview with Floyd Dominy, the chief of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Reclamation; an analysis of the amenity economy; and a profile of progressive ranchers that brought conservation and agriculture together.

Marston was always involved in public life, serving for 18 years on the elected Delta-Montrose Electric Association co-op board, as well as terms with volunteer boards including Delta County Economic Development, Paonia Chamber of Commerce, Solar Energy International, and the Blue Sage Community Art Center. In 2008, he and his wife were named “Champions of the Rockies,” an honor given by Colorado College as part of its State of the Rockies annual report.

Marston was a fierce defender of the West’s birthright of public lands and a generous mentor with young and emerging writers. Many of the writers Marston worked with went on to brilliant careers in journalism and public service.

Marston was a burr in the side of the U.S. Forest Service during the 1990s. One of his notable editorials was headlined: “It’s time to clear-cut the Forest Service.” He was also a commercial developer of Paonia’s two-block downtown and a fierce opponent of anyone — no matter how well funded and powerful — who used political influence to try to close off access to wilderness. Between 2012 and 2015, Marston fought a drawn-out battle with billionaire Bill Koch, who tried to use a congressional land swap to block public access to the Raggeds Wilderness and its elk herd. Ultimately Marston blocked Koch.

Marston is survived by his wife of 52 years, Betsy, who lives in Paonia; daughter Wendy Lehmann and her husband Benjamin Lehmann, and their children Maude and Bruno; and son David Marston and his wife, Edel Clarke, and their daughter Sorcha, all of New York. His also leaves his sister, Ann Rock, of Florida; and cousin Steve Lidofsky and his wife, Lis, of Vermont.

Marston was known to be engaged and curious about issues, politics, and people. He had definite, well-informed ideas about the correct way to do things and was an energetic ally and a formidable foe in local and regional disputes. He loved to think about how to solve problems, and although he found Delta County frustrating in many ways, he loved working with local government, organizations, and citizens to make changes. Marston thrived on conversation and was never shy about asking people about their lives. He also belonged to a book club that he found stretched his mind.

A city kid who grew up in Queens, New York, and worked as a bicycle Good Humor ice cream vendor during the summers, Marston said that rural life brought out the best of him. He was an avid hiker and cross-country skier and appreciated living close to the natural world. Most of all, he was grateful that he and his family chose, 44 years ago, to make a leap of faith and settle in the small town of Paonia, a place Marston protected, agitated and cherished.

May 3, 1950 - August 10, 2018

Ellen LeCompte, 68, died August 10 from a fall in her home in Lawrence, Kansas. Born in Colorado Springs, Colorado to Oliver and Janet LeCompte, the second of six children, Ellie grew up in that city, attending local public schools and later the Colorado Springs School for Girls before transferring to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, where she graduated in 1968. Ellie thrived in the alternative school's iconoclastic atmosphere, where students helped operate the school's farm and build barns.
Ellie attended Pitzer College in Claremont, California and the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah before completing her undergraduate work at Colorado College in Colorado Springs. She held various jobs during and after her college studies, including teaching English at the Technical Vocational Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico and working in administration for the Colorado Springs Symphony.

Ultimately deciding on a career as a psychologist, she entered the psychology program at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, receiving her Ph.D. She spent the rest of her life working in Topeka and Lawrence as a practicing therapist.

She lived life to the fullest, but of all her passions, her love of animals stands out, especially the love of her standard poodles. From childhood on, she was always surrounded by high-spirited poodles: Rachel, Mitch, Wiley, Jannie and dozens more; two, three and even four at a time. Their intelligence and charm delighted her. When one of her poodles disdained ball-chasing, she translated its attitude: "Chasing balls? That's for dumb dogs!"

She was known for her generosity, offering her time and treasure to a multitude of causes. She sometimes rescued injured animals on the roadside, unhesitatingly funding the huge veterinary bills needed to restore the creature's health.

Ellie's vivacious personality filled any room, drawing people to her. More than a few of her friends and family, not to mention her patients, could say she had rescued them. She will be sorely missed.

She was married twice and had no children. She leaves behind four siblings, Jenny Anderson of Berthoud, Colorado; Charles LeCompte of Brookline, Massachusetts; Tom LeCompte of Sharon, Massachusetts; and Peter LeCompte of Walanae, Hawaii.
September 6, 1947 - June 18, 2018

Margaret McClintock Graham, a former director of the Tomales Village Community Services District who helped run Mostly Natives nursery for over 30 years, died last June in a car accident in Colorado. She was 70 years old.

Margaret is remembered by many in West Marin as a warm, straightforward friend and dedicated member of her community. Her husband, Walter Earle, said she was the bravest woman he ever knew.

That bravery manifested itself in myriad ways: trips that spanned the globe when she was a student in college, a move to an unfamiliar coast, a willingness to engage with a goodhearted stranger. When a tree came down in her neighbor’s driveway, she was the first to come over, chainsaw in hand. Once, in her youth, during a party at the mansion of Colorado Governor Richard Lamb, Margaret observed well-heeled guests making a mess of the floor’s white carpets and asked the governor if she could go barefoot in his home. He laughed and told her he would be honored.

Margaret’s curiosity led her to be knowledgeable about a range of topics, and she loved the natural world in particular. “When you talked to Margaret, you had a good time,” her friend and neighbor Sara Duskin said. “You left feeling you’d had a good conversation, whether it was about her lavender plants or a political issue or where she’d been hiking.”

Margaret was born on Sept. 6, 1947, in Denver, Colo. to Charles Andrew Graham and Jean Charters Graham. Mr. Graham was a Yale-educated lawyer and Mrs. Graham a professor of political science at the University of Denver who later worked for Gov. Lamb choosing judicial appointments for the state’s courts.

Both of Margaret’s parents were involved in Democratic politics and held fundraisers for various candidates, including Tim Worth and David Skaggs. Margaret had two older siblings, Andy and Judy, both of whom have passed on.

After attending the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, a boarding school near Aspen, Margaret went off to Barnard College in New York City. But she found the city far too noisy, left after a year, and matriculated to Friends World College, a Quaker school that allowed her to get an education all over the world.

As part of her program in cultural anthropology, Margaret travelled to the Middle East, India, Nepal, Kenya and Japan. She hitchhiked in Afghanistan and learned how to navigate a Volkswagen bus through streets lined with sleeping drunks in Kenya. She graduated in 1972 and arrived in West Marin soon after.

Margaret’s first home in Marin was in Point Reyes Station, in a house on the mesa owned by a friend of hers from Colorado. The natural beauty appealed to her; in addition to loving flora and fauna, Margaret was an avid hiker.

While in Point Reyes Station, Margaret was briefly married to Richard Wiltermood and had a son, Rishi. When her friend sold the house on the mesa, Margaret purchased a 1957 Chevy school bus and parked it on a friend’s property in Marshall. She lived there for a number of years with Rishi in tow.

“It was a school bus from Shasta County, so it was one of those shorter, squat ones designed for skinny little country roads,” Mr. Earle said. Margaret had just moved out of the bus and into an old chicken coop she had fixed up on a property across the street when the two met.

Margaret first encountered Mr. Earle in 1981, thanks to dead fish and a good sense of humor. At the time, both were employed by the Department of Fish and Game. Margaret was working for the wardens, ensuring that fish buyers were not swindling fishermen. Mr. Earle was in charge of sampling fish to determine the herring spawn count.

One day, while he was picking out fish to sample, a co-worker yelled that he was turning on the offloading machine—implying that a boatload of fish was about to fall on Mr. Earle. He quickly jumped aside, only to realize that the other man had been joking. Relieved to find himself fish-free, Mr. Earle started laughing—a reaction that endeared him to Margaret.

“I looked over and saw this woman, and she was smiling, and she came over and said, ‘I just figured you’d be mad when he did that, but you laughed!’” Mr. Earle remembered.

Margaret was intrigued by the work the men were doing, and soon after she became Mr. Earle’s new partner, both in life and in the fish sampling business. They were married on Oct. 9, 1982, and had a son, Kris, in 1984.

In 1983, Margaret and Mr. Earle decided they wanted to do something with a piece of property they had purchased in Tomales.

While Mr. Earle had worked as a gardener and landscaper, Margaret initially protested, saying she didn’t know anything about plants. But she quickly learned, and when Mostly Natives opened off of Highway 1 in 1984, she was in the thick of it, growing the nursery’s supply of native shrubbery.

Nancy Shine, who worked at Mostly Natives for 25 years, remembers Margaret teaching her the names of the native plants and the many ways to care for them. “She liked plants that were shrubs, and trees and grasses—she wasn’t so much into the flowering plants,” Ms. Shine said. She used to tease Margaret that she unduly enjoyed deadheading (the process of removing dead flowers from a plant) because it allowed her to attack the flowers.

While some might find it difficult to work alongside one’s spouse day after day for three decades, Mr. Earle said he had always found it a pleasure. “She was super curious about everything,” he said. “She was good at customer service and answering people’s questions.” Eventually, however, the amount of time and energy expended on the business became too much for the couple, and they sold it last year.

Margaret was “a big personality in Tomales,” Ms. Duskin said. At various points in time, she was involved in a host of community organizations in town, including the Marin/Sonoma Mosquito and Vector Control District, the Tomales Village Community Services District and the Tomales Emergency Response Network. She was also involved in the creation and maintenance of the downtown park.

Both friends and family spoke to her ability to truly be present, both in the community and in her personal interactions. “When you went into the nursery she was so there,” Ms. Duskin said. “She always put down what she was doing and would ask you about yourself.”

Her son Kris agreed, saying that his mother’s presence in his life had been a sweet and steadying constant.

“She was never not there, never afraid to tell me flat out what I needed to hear,” he said. “She was just there, and that’s the part I’ll miss the most.”

Margaret is survived by her husband, Walter, sons Rishi and Kris, and granddaughter, Anika.
July 7, 1929 - Aug. 8, 2018

Here’s what we wrote on Facebook:
Charlie was the son of Steve Shanzer, who greatly influenced the art/silversmithing program at CRMS. At the start of WW2 Charlie and his sister, Doris, were on the last children's refugee boat to sail from Marseilles to Australia where they lived with adoptive parents for the duration of the war. After the war, Charlie came to the US and in 1949 came to Aspen. In 1951 he persuaded Steve, who at that time had been living in New York, to move to Aspen. In 1953 Steve, at the age of 64, was hired by John & Anne Holden to teach French, German and silversmithing at CRMS. He introduced fold-boats to the students, too! Charlie says in his book (Escape Home) "In the 1960s I designed a 'jewelry hogan' at CRMS to my father's specifications." Charlie was a frequent visitor to the school throughout the 60s & 70s and even accompanied Steve and students on several spring trips. In 2013 Charlie published Escape Home: Rebuilding a Life after the Anschluss, which chronicled his father's life as well as his own.

https://www.aspentimes.com/news/local/charles-paterson-founder-of-aspen-iconic-boomerang-lodge-dies/
 September 9, 1986 – May 20, 2018

Michael Joseph Colangelo III, of Huntington Station, died on Sunday, May 20 at age 31.

Beloved husband of Katherine (Berger). Survived by his mother and father Ellen (Reynolds) and Michael Colangelo II.  Colangelo was an NYPD officer assigned to the Canine Unit.
October 1, 1929 - April 14, 2018

George William Stricker passed away on April 14, 2018 after a brief illness. He is survived by two brothers, Jim and Dave, four children, Cynthia, Peter (Cevin), Brian (Julia), and Scott (Sheila), three grandchildren, Leianna, Keoki, and Josh, and two great grandchildren, Isiaiah and Maleia. He is also survived by a world of dear friends.

George was born in The Pas, Manitoba, Canada on October 1, 1929 to American parents. He was raised in Minneapolis, MN where he attended the Blake School; he went on to earn a BA and an MBA at Stanford University, graduating in 1953. Subsequently, he joined the Air Force and met Rolleen Taylor in San Antonio TX. They married soon after, lived in Del Rio TX (where their first child, Cynthia was born), moved to Albuquerque NM, and then to Carbondale CO in 1958 where their three sons were born.

The Stricker family lived on the banks of the Crystal River fly fishing, raising animals, and spending their summers backpacking in the Rockies and the Canyonlands of Utah. As the family was sitting around a campfire under a mountain peak somewhere, George was known to ask the rhetorical question, “Where would you rather be?”.

George worked as the business manager and taught history at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School and later became the Director of Adult Education at the newly founded Colorado Mountain College. The family moved to Gig Harbor WA in 1975 where George ran the adult education program at the University of Puget Sound.

In 1980, his career track took a radical turn into the wind energy field. George was intrigued by renewable energy and became a self-taught developer which took him to Colorado, Hawaii, the Cook Islands, India, China, and various parts of California. George explored the world, living in Europe, Seattle, Palm Springs, and Tehachapi.

In 1995, George retired from the wind business and moved to South Lake Tahoe CA where his son, Brian lived. Not content with golf or taking cruises, he bought a lodge on 20 acres of forest land in the Hope Valley surrounded by the high Sierras, and created a retreat center. During the seven years he owned the property, he hosted numerous weddings, mediation retreats, and sweat lodge ceremonies. In 2006, George moved to the Chesapeake Bay where he bought a house on a small inlet. In 2011, he moved to Austin TX to be close to Cynthia and Scott. Not one to sit idle, George became a volunteer at Barton Hills Elementary School, mentored a boy, and volunteered with Hospice Austin to help terminally-ill people navigate the dying process.

George was an empathic listener and an incorrigible story-teller who always had a joke or a pun available for his captive audience. He was a master at helping others feel loved and cared for and lived true to his mantra, “KEEP SMILING”.

In his own words, George said, “If I am remembered very long, maybe it will be for something I represented rather than for my character or personality, something like: ‘Here’s lies a kind person’, or ‘George always tried to help,’ or ‘The world would be better off if more were like him’, or some similar sort of epitaph. My writing will not be published. My art will not be collected. My woodwork will crumble. But maybe my smile will be passed on and light the eyes of others… Maybe the children I knew will become doctors, professors, clergy-persons, inventors, artists, statesmen, or others who can nudge civilization along an evolutionary path toward greatness. Who could ask for more?”

The family is eternally grateful to the staff of Barton Hills Assisted Living. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice Austin.

May 27, 1936 - March 20, 2018

Mary Beil Gerdeman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the daughter of Elizabeth Lee Beil and Wallace Beil, an ophthalmologist. Mary’s early childhood with her older sister, Betty, was spent in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her favorite memories of this time are from Mississippi where her family bought their first horses and learned horsemanship while riding near a family cottage.

As a teenager, Mary moved to Upper Gallinas Canyon near Montezuma, New Mexico where her parents bought a mountain ranch for Tennessee Walkers and Morgan horses. Mary and her sister, Judy, rode often through the Sangre de Cristo mountains while living on the Lazy B Ranch, later renamed El Porvenir Ranch. Mary attended school in nearby Las Vegas. Her senior year, Mary and her horse moved to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado where she was one of 2 members of the inaugural graduating class in 1954. Her younger sister, Judy, graduated from CRMS as well eight years later.

While attending Highland College in Las Vegas, she met her husband, James Gerdeman. She married Jimmy in 1958, and the couple moved to Austin where she completed her BA in German and Jimmy completed his law degree at the University of Texas. Following graduation, the two moved to Lubbock, Texas where they raised their three daughters. Jimmy ran a law practice and Mary worked for him as a legal secretary. When their daughters were older, Mary accepted a job as a secretary at Texas Tech University.

After Mary and Jimmy divorced in 1981, she started a career in Medical Records. She attended South Plains College and earned an Accredited Records Technician certificate in 1985. She returned to Texas Tech as a medical transcriptionist until her retirement in 1999.

In Lubbock, Mary enjoyed museums, the symphony, weaving, and Texas Tech football. As some of her long-time friends left the area, she considered a move to be closer to family.

In 2004, Mary moved to San Diego near her daughter Amanda’s family. She lived in the Seven Oaks Community of Rancho Bernardo and was an active participant with the RB Travel Club, the Continuing Education Center, and the Daytrippers. With travel club friends, she saw sights across California and traveled to Alaska, New England, Hawaii and Nashville. She loved books, chamber music, opera, and the symphony as well as the San Diego Museum of Art.

Since March 2017, Mary has enjoyed life with new friends at the Belmont Village where she was a regular at the musical performances, trivia, word games, and lectures.
November 28, 1955 - December 21, 2017

Christopher Wylie Link son of M.P. Link Jr. and Elizabeth C. Link.

Chris is survived by his sons, Marshall Link and Tucker Link; their mother Amy Link; his brother Douglas Link; his nieces, Mona Ohmart and Jennifer Link; nephew, Peter Link; grandnephew, Gus Colby and grand nieces, Faith Ohmart and Lena Colby.

Chris was a farmer, carpenter, cabinet and furniture maker, real estate agent, musician, and guitar collector extraordinaire. He was a man of many talents and interests; a student of history, language, culture, and human nature; a lover of books, animals, and the great outdoors. He was an avid camper, hiker, and supporter of environmental organizations.

Christopher will be sorely missed by his family and long-time wide circle of friends. His empathy, compassion, and sparkling sense of humor, along with his razor-sharp intellect, will not be forgotten.
April 18, 1933 - November 10, 2017

Ed Rubovits died unexpectedly the morning of November 10. He was sitting in the sunshine on the portal of his Santa Fe home, having just split a few logs. His wife of 53 years was with him. Ed had retired from a long career in education which included years of serving as headmaster of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, the Verde Valley School in Sedona, Arizona and as head of the upper school of Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon. He was a strong advocate of outdoor and experiential education, and he was an early supporter and organizer of the Portland chapter of Amigos de las Americas. Known for his wry sense of humor, his leadership style often brought perspective to difficult situations. Ed was happiest when he was skiing, hiking, and camping in the mountains or on his bike. In recent years he focused his love of the out of doors on cycling. He enjoyed many tours with Cycle Oregon and participating in school bike trips with students and colleagues. His idea of how to kick off retirement was the solo bicycle trip he took from Missoula, Montana to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Many years ago his infectious biking enthusiasm spread to his wife and his two small sons during a year they spent in France exploring the French countryside on their bicycles. Following his retirement in the mid-'90's Ed and Nancy discovered the Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route across Spain, and they developed an ongoing attachment to it. They made four trips to the Camino and were fortunate to travel the 500-mile route both on bikes and on foot and to spend time in a pilgrims' refuge as volunteer hospitaleros greeting and hosting others traveling the route. Ed's passing leaves uncountable friends and family who will miss him dearly. He is survived by his wife, Nancy and sons, Michael and David Rubovits and their spouses, Bronwen Lodato and Piper Davis, and by Ed's beloved granddaughter, Una Rubovits. He is also survived by his brother-in-law and sister-in-law Rick and Marilyn Hyde and by his nephew and nieces, Jeff, Katie, and Kristen Hyde. Ed said more than once, "we have had wonderful adventures and great good fortune." Donations to his memory may be made to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Carbondale, Colorado.
July 10, 1944 — October 30, 2017

She is survived by her husband of 32 years, Mark Luttrell; her sons Adam Infascelli of Glenwood Springs and Aaron Luttrell of Carbondale; her two sisters Janice Nuckols of Kaneohe, Hawaii, and Nora Nuckols of Vancouver, British Columbia; her two aunts and an uncle in Willimantic, Conn.; nieces, nephews and cousins; as well as many, many good friends.

Maureen was born in Kingsville, Texas, went to high school in Marietta, Ohio, and earned her R.N. from Good Samaritan Hospital in Zanesville, Ohio. She then went on to earn a B.S.N. from the University of Cincinnati and an M.S.N. from the University of Massachusetts. She moved from Boston to Glenwood Springs with her then-husband Joe Infascelli and began nursing at Valley View Hospital in 1975. She moved to Carbondale for the first time to become the residential school nurse and health educator for Colorado Rocky Mountain School.

Maureen later attended the University of Denver, where she earned her master's degree in counseling before returning to Carbondale, where she established her own counseling practice. She then worked a stint at the Advocate Safehouse in Glenwood Springs before Maureen began teaching nursing at Colorado Mountain College. She retired as a professor of nursing in 2011, although she continued to teach clinical and skills labs as adjunct faculty until 2014.

Maureen was committed to the Roaring Fork Women's Triathlon team for 18 years, serving as a coach in various roles, and was just named coach emeritus this summer. She competed Aug. 4, 2017, in the Tri For The Cure in Denver, finishing with her best time in three years. She was also a member of the Tri-Glenwood 30-year club.

After her multiple myeloma diagnosis seven years ago, she was a vibrant member of the Cancer Coffee Walk & Talk group at Valley View Hospital. Maureen loved to give back to the community, most recently serving as a volunteer with the Rosiebelle Art Project, as well as the Carbondale Library Wednesday after-school art program. She was an annual volunteer at Carbondale Mountain Fair as the pie judge, always in a memorable costume. She was also very active in the Carbondale Methodist Church. She provided babysitting, dogsitting and respite care for many of her friends.

Essentially, wherever there was a need, Maureen was there. Maureen was loved and will be remembered by many. She spent 30 years as a volunteer fireman and EMT for the Carbondale Fire Department, so a celebration of her life was held at the firehouse on Sunday, Dec. 3.
February 12, 1990 - October 8, 2017

Having lived for 27 years with the great joy and spirit that was Hayden Kennedy, we share the loss of our son and his partner Inge Perkins as the result of an avalanche in the southern Madison Mountains near Bozeman, Montana, on October 7th.

Inge Perkin’s body was recovered by the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center at the base of Mt. Imp on October 9th. Hayden survived the avalanche but not the unbearable loss of his partner in life. He chose to end his life. Myself and his mother Julie sorrowfully respect his decision.

Hayden truly was an uncensored soul whose accomplishments as a mountaineer were always secondary to his deep friendships and mindfulness.

He recently moved to Bozeman to work on his EMT certification while Inge completed her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and education at Montana State University.

“Over the last few years, however, as I’ve watched too many friends go to the mountains only to never return, I’ve realized something painful,” wrote Hayden in Evening Sends just last month. “It’s not just the memorable summits and crux moves that are fleeting. Friends and climbing partners are fleeting, too. This is the painful reality of our sport, and I’m unsure what to make of it. Climbing is either a beautiful gift or a curse.”
June 6, 1940 - August 25, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017

Don Harvey passed away peacefully May 5, 2017, at his home surrounded by family. Don was born in Montreal, Canada and was raised in Spokane, Washington. He graduated from Whitman College and then went to McGill University in Montreal for medical school, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Don performed his residency at Southern Pacific Hospital in San Francisco where he chose the specialty of Urology.

Don met the love of his life, Jane Mildred Hasfurther, in first grade. They dated through high school and college and were married in 1955. Don and Jane chose to live in Lucas Valley, California, which provided an ideal setting to raise their four boys. They had a rich and full life together, enjoying sailing on the San Francisco Bay, traveling with friends, and family vacations. Every year the family had wonderful vacations at the beach in Bolinas, on the delta at Tinsley Island and, of course, at their beloved Spirit Lake in Idaho. Five generations of Harveys have vacationed at Spirit Lake. Don and Jane spent six months at the lake every year after Don's retirement in 1999.

Don had a distinguished career in medicine. He was a fine surgeon who truly cared about his patients. He enjoyed getting to know them as people and learning about their families and lives. Don served as President of the Marin Medical Society and Commodore of the San Francisco Yacht Club.

Don loved his projects. He restored nautical antiques and wooden speedboats. But his favorite project was expanding the cabins at Spirit Lake so all his children and grandchildren could gather together every summer.

Don is survived by his wife Jane, sons David, Kent, Philip, and Peter and 10 grandchildren.

Published in Spokesman-Review on May 21, 2017
May 13, 1937 - January 21, 2017

Tony Perry died Jan. 21 peacefully in his beloved Colorado home in the arms of his loving family.

To find words to summarize Tony's life is daunting, as he accomplished so much. He was a complex man, memorable and loved.

He was born May 13, 1937, in Greenwich, Connecticut, the son of Margaret and Parker Perry, and spent his early years in Stowe and Manchester, Vermont. He followed his heart to the mountains of Colorado at 16 to a newly organized Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale. This environment nurtured his independent, adventuresome character, where he worked, skied, traveled and earned a ski scholarship to The University of Denver, excelling at athletics and hotel management. He struggled with dyslexia and became very adept at recognizing the skills he lacked, surrounding himself with capable people to help him accomplish his goals. He went on to help others with this affliction to follow a successful path.

A born entrepreneur, his charm, and interest in people drew him to the hospitality business soon after college. After a short stint in the Colorado National Guard, he opened nightclubs in New York, Stowe and Manchester, Vermont, and later turned his attention to the restaurant business. The Sirloin Saloons, Dakotas, Sweetwaters, Perry's Fish House - all institutions representing beauty, fun, great food and lasting memories for the millions who entered their doors.

During the four decades that he ran his many restaurants throughout the Northeast, he employed thousands of people through The Perry Restaurant Group and evolved a management style that was years ahead of its time. He took a deep and abiding interest in the people he worked with, recognizing that by giving them the opportunity to grow and succeed as individuals, their contribution to the business would develop. He put in place an employee stock ownership plan in the 1980s where all employees could benefit; he sent people on courses that helped them empower their lives rather than just their jobs, and he developed an inclusive style of management that engendered immense loyalty to this day.

He supported generously many causes close to his heart - he educated countless children, supported green start-ups, wildlife conservation, The Vermont Land Trust, Nature's Conservancy, music and the arts.

He was a born seeker and adventurer, traveling to over 50 countries, often bringing along his friends and family to share his experiences. He heli-skied throughout the Canadian Rockies, he was an avid fisherman and hunter, at home in the woods as anywhere. He raised a herd of majestic buffalo on his hilltop farm in Vermont with sweeping views of Lake Champlain from his rustic log cabin he built around an apple tree.

He amassed a matrix of friends as diverse as his interests, most who he remained connected to throughout his life. He had a genuine and lasting impact on so many, freely giving love, support and confidence where he felt he was needed. So many thought of him as their best friend.

Tony was profoundly connected to nature and beauty. His love and appreciation of the Native American culture and art form was a passion that brought him endless pleasure.

He was tireless in his quest for the meaning of life, periodically trading his business work for his spiritual journey, moving to an ashram for a time to find fulfillment and love. His pursuit led him to his soul mate, and he and Teri were married in 1995.

For 22 years, they traveled and skied and fly-fished around the world. They built wonderful homes in Colorado, Mexico, and Nantucket, and mostly they enjoyed their transcendent love for each other every day.

His sanctuary was his Colorado mountain ranch, high in the wildflowers, where he built his "Stonehenge" as a legacy. However, his true legacy will last for eternity in the lives that have been altered by his love.

Tony was spiritual, funny, loving and so immeasurably generous.

He lived and died with unequaled courage undaunted by his illnesses, and full of gratitude.

He leaves behind a world enriched by his presence. He is survived by his sister, Judy Perry Rowe, and his nieces, Wendy, Jane and Jenny, his stepson Kenan, Miya and his wonderful grandchildren, Jack, Eliza and Sebastian, who brought special joy to his later years. His extended family is too numerous to mention, but no less important - forever connected in love. Not left behind, but traveling beside him for eternity is his adoring wife, Teri Giguere Perry.

Please honor nature in memory of Tony. We have set up a website online at www.tonyperry.life to share memories, photos, and information about his services.
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