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Home Alumni Memoriam

In Memoriam

Below please find those CRMS friends we have lost since January 2017. We have included obituaries when available. To share additional information please contact Randall Lavelle.

Christopher Link ‘74
November 28, 1955 - December 21, 2017
Christopher Wylie Link son of M.P. Link Jr. and Elizabeth C. Link.

Chris is survived by his sons, Marshall Link and Tucker Link; their mother Amy Link; his brother Douglas Link; his nieces, Mona Ohmart and Jennifer Link; nephew, Peter Link; grandnephew, Gus Colby and grand nieces, Faith Ohmart and Lena Colby.

Chris was a farmer, carpenter, cabinet and furniture maker, real estate agent, musician, and guitar collector extraordinaire. He was a man of many talents and interests; a student of history, language, culture, and human nature; a lover of books, animals, and the great outdoors. He was an avid camper, hiker, and supporter of environmental organizations.

Christopher will be sorely missed by his family and long-time wide circle of friends. His empathy, compassion, and sparkling sense of humor, along with his razor-sharp intellect, will not be forgotten.


Ed Rubovits, Head of School 1970-76, Faculty 1959-70
April 18, 1933 - November 10, 2017

Ed Rubovits died unexpectedly the morning of November 10. He was sitting in the sunshine on the portal of his Santa Fe home, having just split a few logs. His wife of 53 years was with him. Ed had retired from a long career in education which included years of serving as headmaster of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, the Verde Valley School in Sedona, Arizona and as head of the upper school of Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon. He was a strong advocate of outdoor and experiential education, and he was an early supporter and organizer of the Portland chapter of Amigos de las Americas. Known for his wry sense of humor, his leadership style often brought perspective to difficult situations. Ed was happiest when he was skiing, hiking, and camping in the mountains or on his bike. In recent years he focused his love of the out of doors on cycling. He enjoyed many tours with Cycle Oregon and participating in school bike trips with students and colleagues. His idea of how to kick off retirement was the solo bicycle trip he took from Missoula, Montana to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Many years ago his infectious biking enthusiasm spread to his wife and his two small sons during a year they spent in France exploring the French countryside on their bicycles. Following his retirement in the mid-'90's Ed and Nancy discovered the Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route across Spain, and they developed an ongoing attachment to it. They made four trips to the Camino and were fortunate to travel the 500-mile route both on bikes and on foot and to spend time in a pilgrims' refuge as volunteer hospitaleros greeting and hosting others traveling the route. Ed's passing leaves uncountable friends and family who will miss him dearly. He is survived by his wife, Nancy and sons, Michael and David Rubovits and their spouses, Bronwen Lodato and Piper Davis, and by Ed's beloved granddaughter, Una Rubovits. He is also survived by his brother-in-law and sister-in-law Rick and Marilyn Hyde and by his nephew and nieces, Jeff, Katie, and Kristen Hyde. Ed said more than once, "we have had wonderful adventures and great good fortune." Donations to his memory may be made to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Carbondale, Colorado.
Hayden M. Kennedy ‘09
February 12, 1990 - October 8, 2017
Having lived for 27 years with the great joy and spirit that was Hayden Kennedy, we share the loss of our son and his partner Inge Perkins as the result of an avalanche in the southern Madison Mountains near Bozeman, Montana, on October 7th.

Inge Perkin’s body was recovered by the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center at the base of Mt. Imp on October 9th. Hayden survived the avalanche but not the unbearable loss of his partner in life. He chose to end his life. Myself and his mother Julie sorrowfully respect his decision.

Hayden truly was an uncensored soul whose accomplishments as a mountaineer were always secondary to his deep friendships and mindfulness.

He recently moved to Bozeman to work on his EMT certification while Inge completed her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and education at Montana State University.

“Over the last few years, however, as I’ve watched too many friends go to the mountains only to never return, I’ve realized something painful,” wrote Hayden in Evening Sends just last month. “It’s not just the memorable summits and crux moves that are fleeting. Friends and climbing partners are fleeting, too. This is the painful reality of our sport, and I’m unsure what to make of it. Climbing is either a beautiful gift or a curse.”

Mary Grant ‘58
June 6, 1940 - August 25, 2017

Jeffrey D. Tuerk ‘90
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017

Donald Harvey ‘74
Don Harvey passed away peacefully May 5, 2017, at his home surrounded by family. Don was born in Montreal, Canada and was raised in Spokane, Washington. He graduated from Whitman College and then went to McGill University in Montreal for medical school, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Don performed his residency at Southern Pacific Hospital in San Francisco where he chose the specialty of Urology.

Don met the love of his life, Jane Mildred Hasfurther, in first grade. They dated through high school and college and were married in 1955. Don and Jane chose to live in Lucas Valley, California, which provided an ideal setting to raise their four boys. They had a rich and full life together, enjoying sailing on the San Francisco Bay, traveling with friends, and family vacations. Every year the family had wonderful vacations at the beach in Bolinas, on the delta at Tinsley Island and, of course, at their beloved Spirit Lake in Idaho. Five generations of Harveys have vacationed at Spirit Lake. Don and Jane spent six months at the lake every year after Don's retirement in 1999.

Don had a distinguished career in medicine. He was a fine surgeon who truly cared about his patients. He enjoyed getting to know them as people and learning about their families and lives. Don served as President of the Marin Medical Society and Commodore of the San Francisco Yacht Club.

Don loved his projects. He restored nautical antiques and wooden speedboats. But his favorite project was expanding the cabins at Spirit Lake so all his children and grandchildren could gather together every summer.

Don is survived by his wife Jane, sons David, Kent, Philip, and Peter and 10 grandchildren.

Published in Spokesman-Review on May 21, 2017

Anthony Perry ‘55
May 13, 1937 - January 21, 2017
Tony Perry died Jan. 21 peacefully in his beloved Colorado home in the arms of his loving family.

To find words to summarize Tony's life is daunting, as he accomplished so much. He was a complex man, memorable and loved.

He was born May 13, 1937, in Greenwich, Connecticut, the son of Margaret and Parker Perry, and spent his early years in Stowe and Manchester, Vermont. He followed his heart to the mountains of Colorado at 16 to a newly organized Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale. This environment nurtured his independent, adventuresome character, where he worked, skied, traveled and earned a ski scholarship to The University of Denver, excelling at athletics and hotel management. He struggled with dyslexia and became very adept at recognizing the skills he lacked, surrounding himself with capable people to help him accomplish his goals. He went on to help others with this affliction to follow a successful path.

A born entrepreneur, his charm, and interest in people drew him to the hospitality business soon after college. After a short stint in the Colorado National Guard, he opened nightclubs in New York, Stowe and Manchester, Vermont, and later turned his attention to the restaurant business. The Sirloin Saloons, Dakotas, Sweetwaters, Perry's Fish House - all institutions representing beauty, fun, great food and lasting memories for the millions who entered their doors.

During the four decades that he ran his many restaurants throughout the Northeast, he employed thousands of people through The Perry Restaurant Group and evolved a management style that was years ahead of its time. He took a deep and abiding interest in the people he worked with, recognizing that by giving them the opportunity to grow and succeed as individuals, their contribution to the business would develop. He put in place an employee stock ownership plan in the 1980s where all employees could benefit; he sent people on courses that helped them empower their lives rather than just their jobs, and he developed an inclusive style of management that engendered immense loyalty to this day.

He supported generously many causes close to his heart - he educated countless children, supported green start-ups, wildlife conservation, The Vermont Land Trust, Nature's Conservancy, music and the arts.

He was a born seeker and adventurer, traveling to over 50 countries, often bringing along his friends and family to share his experiences. He heli-skied throughout the Canadian Rockies, he was an avid fisherman and hunter, at home in the woods as anywhere. He raised a herd of majestic buffalo on his hilltop farm in Vermont with sweeping views of Lake Champlain from his rustic log cabin he built around an apple tree.

He amassed a matrix of friends as diverse as his interests, most who he remained connected to throughout his life. He had a genuine and lasting impact on so many, freely giving love, support and confidence where he felt he was needed. So many thought of him as their best friend.

Tony was profoundly connected to nature and beauty. His love and appreciation of the Native American culture and art form was a passion that brought him endless pleasure.

He was tireless in his quest for the meaning of life, periodically trading his business work for his spiritual journey, moving to an ashram for a time to find fulfillment and love. His pursuit led him to his soul mate, and he and Teri were married in 1995.

For 22 years, they traveled and skied and fly-fished around the world. They built wonderful homes in Colorado, Mexico, and Nantucket, and mostly they enjoyed their transcendent love for each other every day.

His sanctuary was his Colorado mountain ranch, high in the wildflowers, where he built his "Stonehenge" as a legacy. However, his true legacy will last for eternity in the lives that have been altered by his love.

Tony was spiritual, funny, loving and so immeasurably generous.

He lived and died with unequaled courage undaunted by his illnesses, and full of gratitude.

He leaves behind a world enriched by his presence. He is survived by his sister, Judy Perry Rowe, and his nieces, Wendy, Jane and Jenny, his stepson Kenan, Miya and his wonderful grandchildren, Jack, Eliza and Sebastian, who brought special joy to his later years. His extended family is too numerous to mention, but no less important - forever connected in love. Not left behind, but traveling beside him for eternity is his adoring wife, Teri Giguere Perry.

Please honor nature in memory of Tony. We have set up a website online at www.tonyperry.life to share memories, photos, and information about his services.


Alumni

Home Alumni Memoriam

In Memoriam

Below please find those CRMS friends we have lost since January 2017. We have included obituaries when available. To share additional information please contact Randall Lavelle.

Christopher Link ‘74
November 28, 1955 - December 21, 2017
Christopher Wylie Link son of M.P. Link Jr. and Elizabeth C. Link.

Chris is survived by his sons, Marshall Link and Tucker Link; their mother Amy Link; his brother Douglas Link; his nieces, Mona Ohmart and Jennifer Link; nephew, Peter Link; grandnephew, Gus Colby and grand nieces, Faith Ohmart and Lena Colby.

Chris was a farmer, carpenter, cabinet and furniture maker, real estate agent, musician, and guitar collector extraordinaire. He was a man of many talents and interests; a student of history, language, culture, and human nature; a lover of books, animals, and the great outdoors. He was an avid camper, hiker, and supporter of environmental organizations.

Christopher will be sorely missed by his family and long-time wide circle of friends. His empathy, compassion, and sparkling sense of humor, along with his razor-sharp intellect, will not be forgotten.


Ed Rubovits, Head of School 1970-76, Faculty 1959-70
April 18, 1933 - November 10, 2017

Ed Rubovits died unexpectedly the morning of November 10. He was sitting in the sunshine on the portal of his Santa Fe home, having just split a few logs. His wife of 53 years was with him. Ed had retired from a long career in education which included years of serving as headmaster of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, the Verde Valley School in Sedona, Arizona and as head of the upper school of Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon. He was a strong advocate of outdoor and experiential education, and he was an early supporter and organizer of the Portland chapter of Amigos de las Americas. Known for his wry sense of humor, his leadership style often brought perspective to difficult situations. Ed was happiest when he was skiing, hiking, and camping in the mountains or on his bike. In recent years he focused his love of the out of doors on cycling. He enjoyed many tours with Cycle Oregon and participating in school bike trips with students and colleagues. His idea of how to kick off retirement was the solo bicycle trip he took from Missoula, Montana to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Many years ago his infectious biking enthusiasm spread to his wife and his two small sons during a year they spent in France exploring the French countryside on their bicycles. Following his retirement in the mid-'90's Ed and Nancy discovered the Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route across Spain, and they developed an ongoing attachment to it. They made four trips to the Camino and were fortunate to travel the 500-mile route both on bikes and on foot and to spend time in a pilgrims' refuge as volunteer hospitaleros greeting and hosting others traveling the route. Ed's passing leaves uncountable friends and family who will miss him dearly. He is survived by his wife, Nancy and sons, Michael and David Rubovits and their spouses, Bronwen Lodato and Piper Davis, and by Ed's beloved granddaughter, Una Rubovits. He is also survived by his brother-in-law and sister-in-law Rick and Marilyn Hyde and by his nephew and nieces, Jeff, Katie, and Kristen Hyde. Ed said more than once, "we have had wonderful adventures and great good fortune." Donations to his memory may be made to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Carbondale, Colorado.
Hayden M. Kennedy ‘09
February 12, 1990 - October 8, 2017
Having lived for 27 years with the great joy and spirit that was Hayden Kennedy, we share the loss of our son and his partner Inge Perkins as the result of an avalanche in the southern Madison Mountains near Bozeman, Montana, on October 7th.

Inge Perkin’s body was recovered by the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center at the base of Mt. Imp on October 9th. Hayden survived the avalanche but not the unbearable loss of his partner in life. He chose to end his life. Myself and his mother Julie sorrowfully respect his decision.

Hayden truly was an uncensored soul whose accomplishments as a mountaineer were always secondary to his deep friendships and mindfulness.

He recently moved to Bozeman to work on his EMT certification while Inge completed her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and education at Montana State University.

“Over the last few years, however, as I’ve watched too many friends go to the mountains only to never return, I’ve realized something painful,” wrote Hayden in Evening Sends just last month. “It’s not just the memorable summits and crux moves that are fleeting. Friends and climbing partners are fleeting, too. This is the painful reality of our sport, and I’m unsure what to make of it. Climbing is either a beautiful gift or a curse.”

Mary Grant ‘58
June 6, 1940 - August 25, 2017

Jeffrey D. Tuerk ‘90
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017

Donald Harvey ‘74
Don Harvey passed away peacefully May 5, 2017, at his home surrounded by family. Don was born in Montreal, Canada and was raised in Spokane, Washington. He graduated from Whitman College and then went to McGill University in Montreal for medical school, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Don performed his residency at Southern Pacific Hospital in San Francisco where he chose the specialty of Urology.

Don met the love of his life, Jane Mildred Hasfurther, in first grade. They dated through high school and college and were married in 1955. Don and Jane chose to live in Lucas Valley, California, which provided an ideal setting to raise their four boys. They had a rich and full life together, enjoying sailing on the San Francisco Bay, traveling with friends, and family vacations. Every year the family had wonderful vacations at the beach in Bolinas, on the delta at Tinsley Island and, of course, at their beloved Spirit Lake in Idaho. Five generations of Harveys have vacationed at Spirit Lake. Don and Jane spent six months at the lake every year after Don's retirement in 1999.

Don had a distinguished career in medicine. He was a fine surgeon who truly cared about his patients. He enjoyed getting to know them as people and learning about their families and lives. Don served as President of the Marin Medical Society and Commodore of the San Francisco Yacht Club.

Don loved his projects. He restored nautical antiques and wooden speedboats. But his favorite project was expanding the cabins at Spirit Lake so all his children and grandchildren could gather together every summer.

Don is survived by his wife Jane, sons David, Kent, Philip, and Peter and 10 grandchildren.

Published in Spokesman-Review on May 21, 2017

Anthony Perry ‘55
May 13, 1937 - January 21, 2017
Tony Perry died Jan. 21 peacefully in his beloved Colorado home in the arms of his loving family.

To find words to summarize Tony's life is daunting, as he accomplished so much. He was a complex man, memorable and loved.

He was born May 13, 1937, in Greenwich, Connecticut, the son of Margaret and Parker Perry, and spent his early years in Stowe and Manchester, Vermont. He followed his heart to the mountains of Colorado at 16 to a newly organized Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale. This environment nurtured his independent, adventuresome character, where he worked, skied, traveled and earned a ski scholarship to The University of Denver, excelling at athletics and hotel management. He struggled with dyslexia and became very adept at recognizing the skills he lacked, surrounding himself with capable people to help him accomplish his goals. He went on to help others with this affliction to follow a successful path.

A born entrepreneur, his charm, and interest in people drew him to the hospitality business soon after college. After a short stint in the Colorado National Guard, he opened nightclubs in New York, Stowe and Manchester, Vermont, and later turned his attention to the restaurant business. The Sirloin Saloons, Dakotas, Sweetwaters, Perry's Fish House - all institutions representing beauty, fun, great food and lasting memories for the millions who entered their doors.

During the four decades that he ran his many restaurants throughout the Northeast, he employed thousands of people through The Perry Restaurant Group and evolved a management style that was years ahead of its time. He took a deep and abiding interest in the people he worked with, recognizing that by giving them the opportunity to grow and succeed as individuals, their contribution to the business would develop. He put in place an employee stock ownership plan in the 1980s where all employees could benefit; he sent people on courses that helped them empower their lives rather than just their jobs, and he developed an inclusive style of management that engendered immense loyalty to this day.

He supported generously many causes close to his heart - he educated countless children, supported green start-ups, wildlife conservation, The Vermont Land Trust, Nature's Conservancy, music and the arts.

He was a born seeker and adventurer, traveling to over 50 countries, often bringing along his friends and family to share his experiences. He heli-skied throughout the Canadian Rockies, he was an avid fisherman and hunter, at home in the woods as anywhere. He raised a herd of majestic buffalo on his hilltop farm in Vermont with sweeping views of Lake Champlain from his rustic log cabin he built around an apple tree.

He amassed a matrix of friends as diverse as his interests, most who he remained connected to throughout his life. He had a genuine and lasting impact on so many, freely giving love, support and confidence where he felt he was needed. So many thought of him as their best friend.

Tony was profoundly connected to nature and beauty. His love and appreciation of the Native American culture and art form was a passion that brought him endless pleasure.

He was tireless in his quest for the meaning of life, periodically trading his business work for his spiritual journey, moving to an ashram for a time to find fulfillment and love. His pursuit led him to his soul mate, and he and Teri were married in 1995.

For 22 years, they traveled and skied and fly-fished around the world. They built wonderful homes in Colorado, Mexico, and Nantucket, and mostly they enjoyed their transcendent love for each other every day.

His sanctuary was his Colorado mountain ranch, high in the wildflowers, where he built his "Stonehenge" as a legacy. However, his true legacy will last for eternity in the lives that have been altered by his love.

Tony was spiritual, funny, loving and so immeasurably generous.

He lived and died with unequaled courage undaunted by his illnesses, and full of gratitude.

He leaves behind a world enriched by his presence. He is survived by his sister, Judy Perry Rowe, and his nieces, Wendy, Jane and Jenny, his stepson Kenan, Miya and his wonderful grandchildren, Jack, Eliza and Sebastian, who brought special joy to his later years. His extended family is too numerous to mention, but no less important - forever connected in love. Not left behind, but traveling beside him for eternity is his adoring wife, Teri Giguere Perry.

Please honor nature in memory of Tony. We have set up a website online at www.tonyperry.life to share memories, photos, and information about his services.


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