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Home Alumni In Memoriam

In Memoriam

Below please find those CRMS friends we have lost since January 2017. We have included obituaries when available. To share additional information please contact Nicole Padgett.
 September 9, 1986 – May 20, 2018

Michael Joseph Colangelo III, of Huntington Station, died on Sunday, May 20 at age 31.

Beloved husband of Katherine (Berger). Survived by his mother and father Ellen (Reynolds) and Michael Colangelo II.  Colangelo was an NYPD officer assigned to the Canine Unit.
October 1, 1929 - April 14, 2018

George William Stricker passed away on April 14, 2018 after a brief illness. He is survived by two brothers, Jim and Dave, four children, Cynthia, Peter (Cevin), Brian (Julia), and Scott (Sheila), three grandchildren, Leianna, Keoki, and Josh, and two great grandchildren, Isiaiah and Maleia. He is also survived by a world of dear friends.

George was born in The Pas, Manitoba, Canada on October 1, 1929 to American parents. He was raised in Minneapolis, MN where he attended the Blake School; he went on to earn a BA and an MBA at Stanford University, graduating in 1953. Subsequently, he joined the Air Force and met Rolleen Taylor in San Antonio TX. They married soon after, lived in Del Rio TX (where their first child, Cynthia was born), moved to Albuquerque NM, and then to Carbondale CO in 1958 where their three sons were born.

The Stricker family lived on the banks of the Crystal River fly fishing, raising animals, and spending their summers backpacking in the Rockies and the Canyonlands of Utah. As the family was sitting around a campfire under a mountain peak somewhere, George was known to ask the rhetorical question, “Where would you rather be?”.

George worked as the business manager and taught history at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School and later became the Director of Adult Education at the newly founded Colorado Mountain College. The family moved to Gig Harbor WA in 1975 where George ran the adult education program at the University of Puget Sound.

In 1980, his career track took a radical turn into the wind energy field. George was intrigued by renewable energy and became a self-taught developer which took him to Colorado, Hawaii, the Cook Islands, India, China, and various parts of California. George explored the world, living in Europe, Seattle, Palm Springs, and Tehachapi.

In 1995, George retired from the wind business and moved to South Lake Tahoe CA where his son, Brian lived. Not content with golf or taking cruises, he bought a lodge on 20 acres of forest land in the Hope Valley surrounded by the high Sierras, and created a retreat center. During the seven years he owned the property, he hosted numerous weddings, mediation retreats, and sweat lodge ceremonies. In 2006, George moved to the Chesapeake Bay where he bought a house on a small inlet. In 2011, he moved to Austin TX to be close to Cynthia and Scott. Not one to sit idle, George became a volunteer at Barton Hills Elementary School, mentored a boy, and volunteered with Hospice Austin to help terminally-ill people navigate the dying process.

George was an empathic listener and an incorrigible story-teller who always had a joke or a pun available for his captive audience. He was a master at helping others feel loved and cared for and lived true to his mantra, “KEEP SMILING”.

In his own words, George said, “If I am remembered very long, maybe it will be for something I represented rather than for my character or personality, something like: ‘Here’s lies a kind person’, or ‘George always tried to help,’ or ‘The world would be better off if more were like him’, or some similar sort of epitaph. My writing will not be published. My art will not be collected. My woodwork will crumble. But maybe my smile will be passed on and light the eyes of others… Maybe the children I knew will become doctors, professors, clergy-persons, inventors, artists, statesmen, or others who can nudge civilization along an evolutionary path toward greatness. Who could ask for more?”

The family is eternally grateful to the staff of Barton Hills Assisted Living. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice Austin.

May 27, 1936 - March 20, 2018

Mary Beil Gerdeman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the daughter of Elizabeth Lee Beil and Wallace Beil, an ophthalmologist. Mary’s early childhood with her older sister, Betty, was spent in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her favorite memories of this time are from Mississippi where her family bought their first horses and learned horsemanship while riding near a family cottage.

As a teenager, Mary moved to Upper Gallinas Canyon near Montezuma, New Mexico where her parents bought a mountain ranch for Tennessee Walkers and Morgan horses. Mary and her sister, Judy, rode often through the Sangre de Cristo mountains while living on the Lazy B Ranch, later renamed El Porvenir Ranch. Mary attended school in nearby Las Vegas. Her senior year, Mary and her horse moved to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado where she was one of 2 members of the inaugural graduating class in 1954. Her younger sister, Judy, graduated from CRMS as well eight years later.

While attending Highland College in Las Vegas, she met her husband, James Gerdeman. She married Jimmy in 1958, and the couple moved to Austin where she completed her BA in German and Jimmy completed his law degree at the University of Texas. Following graduation, the two moved to Lubbock, Texas where they raised their three daughters. Jimmy ran a law practice and Mary worked for him as a legal secretary. When their daughters were older, Mary accepted a job as a secretary at Texas Tech University.

After Mary and Jimmy divorced in 1981, she started a career in Medical Records. She attended South Plains College and earned an Accredited Records Technician certificate in 1985. She returned to Texas Tech as a medical transcriptionist until her retirement in 1999.

In Lubbock, Mary enjoyed museums, the symphony, weaving, and Texas Tech football. As some of her long-time friends left the area, she considered a move to be closer to family.

In 2004, Mary moved to San Diego near her daughter Amanda’s family. She lived in the Seven Oaks Community of Rancho Bernardo and was an active participant with the RB Travel Club, the Continuing Education Center, and the Daytrippers. With travel club friends, she saw sights across California and traveled to Alaska, New England, Hawaii and Nashville. She loved books, chamber music, opera, and the symphony as well as the San Diego Museum of Art.

Since March 2017, Mary has enjoyed life with new friends at the Belmont Village where she was a regular at the musical performances, trivia, word games, and lectures.
November 28, 1955 - December 21, 2017

Christopher Wylie Link son of M.P. Link Jr. and Elizabeth C. Link.

Chris is survived by his sons, Marshall Link and Tucker Link; their mother Amy Link; his brother Douglas Link; his nieces, Mona Ohmart and Jennifer Link; nephew, Peter Link; grandnephew, Gus Colby and grand nieces, Faith Ohmart and Lena Colby.

Chris was a farmer, carpenter, cabinet and furniture maker, real estate agent, musician, and guitar collector extraordinaire. He was a man of many talents and interests; a student of history, language, culture, and human nature; a lover of books, animals, and the great outdoors. He was an avid camper, hiker, and supporter of environmental organizations.

Christopher will be sorely missed by his family and long-time wide circle of friends. His empathy, compassion, and sparkling sense of humor, along with his razor-sharp intellect, will not be forgotten.
April 18, 1933 - November 10, 2017

Ed Rubovits died unexpectedly the morning of November 10. He was sitting in the sunshine on the portal of his Santa Fe home, having just split a few logs. His wife of 53 years was with him. Ed had retired from a long career in education which included years of serving as headmaster of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, the Verde Valley School in Sedona, Arizona and as head of the upper school of Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon. He was a strong advocate of outdoor and experiential education, and he was an early supporter and organizer of the Portland chapter of Amigos de las Americas. Known for his wry sense of humor, his leadership style often brought perspective to difficult situations. Ed was happiest when he was skiing, hiking, and camping in the mountains or on his bike. In recent years he focused his love of the out of doors on cycling. He enjoyed many tours with Cycle Oregon and participating in school bike trips with students and colleagues. His idea of how to kick off retirement was the solo bicycle trip he took from Missoula, Montana to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Many years ago his infectious biking enthusiasm spread to his wife and his two small sons during a year they spent in France exploring the French countryside on their bicycles. Following his retirement in the mid-'90's Ed and Nancy discovered the Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route across Spain, and they developed an ongoing attachment to it. They made four trips to the Camino and were fortunate to travel the 500-mile route both on bikes and on foot and to spend time in a pilgrims' refuge as volunteer hospitaleros greeting and hosting others traveling the route. Ed's passing leaves uncountable friends and family who will miss him dearly. He is survived by his wife, Nancy and sons, Michael and David Rubovits and their spouses, Bronwen Lodato and Piper Davis, and by Ed's beloved granddaughter, Una Rubovits. He is also survived by his brother-in-law and sister-in-law Rick and Marilyn Hyde and by his nephew and nieces, Jeff, Katie, and Kristen Hyde. Ed said more than once, "we have had wonderful adventures and great good fortune." Donations to his memory may be made to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Carbondale, Colorado.
July 10, 1944 — October 30, 2017

She is survived by her husband of 32 years, Mark Luttrell; her sons Adam Infascelli of Glenwood Springs and Aaron Luttrell of Carbondale; her two sisters Janice Nuckols of Kaneohe, Hawaii, and Nora Nuckols of Vancouver, British Columbia; her two aunts and an uncle in Willimantic, Conn.; nieces, nephews and cousins; as well as many, many good friends.

Maureen was born in Kingsville, Texas, went to high school in Marietta, Ohio, and earned her R.N. from Good Samaritan Hospital in Zanesville, Ohio. She then went on to earn a B.S.N. from the University of Cincinnati and an M.S.N. from the University of Massachusetts. She moved from Boston to Glenwood Springs with her then-husband Joe Infascelli and began nursing at Valley View Hospital in 1975. She moved to Carbondale for the first time to become the residential school nurse and health educator for Colorado Rocky Mountain School.

Maureen later attended the University of Denver, where she earned her master's degree in counseling before returning to Carbondale, where she established her own counseling practice. She then worked a stint at the Advocate Safehouse in Glenwood Springs before Maureen began teaching nursing at Colorado Mountain College. She retired as a professor of nursing in 2011, although she continued to teach clinical and skills labs as adjunct faculty until 2014.

Maureen was committed to the Roaring Fork Women's Triathlon team for 18 years, serving as a coach in various roles, and was just named coach emeritus this summer. She competed Aug. 4, 2017, in the Tri For The Cure in Denver, finishing with her best time in three years. She was also a member of the Tri-Glenwood 30-year club.

After her multiple myeloma diagnosis seven years ago, she was a vibrant member of the Cancer Coffee Walk & Talk group at Valley View Hospital. Maureen loved to give back to the community, most recently serving as a volunteer with the Rosiebelle Art Project, as well as the Carbondale Library Wednesday after-school art program. She was an annual volunteer at Carbondale Mountain Fair as the pie judge, always in a memorable costume. She was also very active in the Carbondale Methodist Church. She provided babysitting, dogsitting and respite care for many of her friends.

Essentially, wherever there was a need, Maureen was there. Maureen was loved and will be remembered by many. She spent 30 years as a volunteer fireman and EMT for the Carbondale Fire Department, so a celebration of her life was held at the firehouse on Sunday, Dec. 3.
February 12, 1990 - October 8, 2017

Having lived for 27 years with the great joy and spirit that was Hayden Kennedy, we share the loss of our son and his partner Inge Perkins as the result of an avalanche in the southern Madison Mountains near Bozeman, Montana, on October 7th.

Inge Perkin’s body was recovered by the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center at the base of Mt. Imp on October 9th. Hayden survived the avalanche but not the unbearable loss of his partner in life. He chose to end his life. Myself and his mother Julie sorrowfully respect his decision.

Hayden truly was an uncensored soul whose accomplishments as a mountaineer were always secondary to his deep friendships and mindfulness.

He recently moved to Bozeman to work on his EMT certification while Inge completed her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and education at Montana State University.

“Over the last few years, however, as I’ve watched too many friends go to the mountains only to never return, I’ve realized something painful,” wrote Hayden in Evening Sends just last month. “It’s not just the memorable summits and crux moves that are fleeting. Friends and climbing partners are fleeting, too. This is the painful reality of our sport, and I’m unsure what to make of it. Climbing is either a beautiful gift or a curse.”
June 6, 1940 - August 25, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017

Don Harvey passed away peacefully May 5, 2017, at his home surrounded by family. Don was born in Montreal, Canada and was raised in Spokane, Washington. He graduated from Whitman College and then went to McGill University in Montreal for medical school, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Don performed his residency at Southern Pacific Hospital in San Francisco where he chose the specialty of Urology.

Don met the love of his life, Jane Mildred Hasfurther, in first grade. They dated through high school and college and were married in 1955. Don and Jane chose to live in Lucas Valley, California, which provided an ideal setting to raise their four boys. They had a rich and full life together, enjoying sailing on the San Francisco Bay, traveling with friends, and family vacations. Every year the family had wonderful vacations at the beach in Bolinas, on the delta at Tinsley Island and, of course, at their beloved Spirit Lake in Idaho. Five generations of Harveys have vacationed at Spirit Lake. Don and Jane spent six months at the lake every year after Don's retirement in 1999.

Don had a distinguished career in medicine. He was a fine surgeon who truly cared about his patients. He enjoyed getting to know them as people and learning about their families and lives. Don served as President of the Marin Medical Society and Commodore of the San Francisco Yacht Club.

Don loved his projects. He restored nautical antiques and wooden speedboats. But his favorite project was expanding the cabins at Spirit Lake so all his children and grandchildren could gather together every summer.

Don is survived by his wife Jane, sons David, Kent, Philip, and Peter and 10 grandchildren.

Published in Spokesman-Review on May 21, 2017
May 13, 1937 - January 21, 2017

Tony Perry died Jan. 21 peacefully in his beloved Colorado home in the arms of his loving family.

To find words to summarize Tony's life is daunting, as he accomplished so much. He was a complex man, memorable and loved.

He was born May 13, 1937, in Greenwich, Connecticut, the son of Margaret and Parker Perry, and spent his early years in Stowe and Manchester, Vermont. He followed his heart to the mountains of Colorado at 16 to a newly organized Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale. This environment nurtured his independent, adventuresome character, where he worked, skied, traveled and earned a ski scholarship to The University of Denver, excelling at athletics and hotel management. He struggled with dyslexia and became very adept at recognizing the skills he lacked, surrounding himself with capable people to help him accomplish his goals. He went on to help others with this affliction to follow a successful path.

A born entrepreneur, his charm, and interest in people drew him to the hospitality business soon after college. After a short stint in the Colorado National Guard, he opened nightclubs in New York, Stowe and Manchester, Vermont, and later turned his attention to the restaurant business. The Sirloin Saloons, Dakotas, Sweetwaters, Perry's Fish House - all institutions representing beauty, fun, great food and lasting memories for the millions who entered their doors.

During the four decades that he ran his many restaurants throughout the Northeast, he employed thousands of people through The Perry Restaurant Group and evolved a management style that was years ahead of its time. He took a deep and abiding interest in the people he worked with, recognizing that by giving them the opportunity to grow and succeed as individuals, their contribution to the business would develop. He put in place an employee stock ownership plan in the 1980s where all employees could benefit; he sent people on courses that helped them empower their lives rather than just their jobs, and he developed an inclusive style of management that engendered immense loyalty to this day.

He supported generously many causes close to his heart - he educated countless children, supported green start-ups, wildlife conservation, The Vermont Land Trust, Nature's Conservancy, music and the arts.

He was a born seeker and adventurer, traveling to over 50 countries, often bringing along his friends and family to share his experiences. He heli-skied throughout the Canadian Rockies, he was an avid fisherman and hunter, at home in the woods as anywhere. He raised a herd of majestic buffalo on his hilltop farm in Vermont with sweeping views of Lake Champlain from his rustic log cabin he built around an apple tree.

He amassed a matrix of friends as diverse as his interests, most who he remained connected to throughout his life. He had a genuine and lasting impact on so many, freely giving love, support and confidence where he felt he was needed. So many thought of him as their best friend.

Tony was profoundly connected to nature and beauty. His love and appreciation of the Native American culture and art form was a passion that brought him endless pleasure.

He was tireless in his quest for the meaning of life, periodically trading his business work for his spiritual journey, moving to an ashram for a time to find fulfillment and love. His pursuit led him to his soul mate, and he and Teri were married in 1995.

For 22 years, they traveled and skied and fly-fished around the world. They built wonderful homes in Colorado, Mexico, and Nantucket, and mostly they enjoyed their transcendent love for each other every day.

His sanctuary was his Colorado mountain ranch, high in the wildflowers, where he built his "Stonehenge" as a legacy. However, his true legacy will last for eternity in the lives that have been altered by his love.

Tony was spiritual, funny, loving and so immeasurably generous.

He lived and died with unequaled courage undaunted by his illnesses, and full of gratitude.

He leaves behind a world enriched by his presence. He is survived by his sister, Judy Perry Rowe, and his nieces, Wendy, Jane and Jenny, his stepson Kenan, Miya and his wonderful grandchildren, Jack, Eliza and Sebastian, who brought special joy to his later years. His extended family is too numerous to mention, but no less important - forever connected in love. Not left behind, but traveling beside him for eternity is his adoring wife, Teri Giguere Perry.

Please honor nature in memory of Tony. We have set up a website online at www.tonyperry.life to share memories, photos, and information about his services.

Alumni

Home Alumni In Memoriam

In Memoriam

Below please find those CRMS friends we have lost since January 2017. We have included obituaries when available. To share additional information please contact Nicole Padgett.
 September 9, 1986 – May 20, 2018

Michael Joseph Colangelo III, of Huntington Station, died on Sunday, May 20 at age 31.

Beloved husband of Katherine (Berger). Survived by his mother and father Ellen (Reynolds) and Michael Colangelo II.  Colangelo was an NYPD officer assigned to the Canine Unit.
October 1, 1929 - April 14, 2018

George William Stricker passed away on April 14, 2018 after a brief illness. He is survived by two brothers, Jim and Dave, four children, Cynthia, Peter (Cevin), Brian (Julia), and Scott (Sheila), three grandchildren, Leianna, Keoki, and Josh, and two great grandchildren, Isiaiah and Maleia. He is also survived by a world of dear friends.

George was born in The Pas, Manitoba, Canada on October 1, 1929 to American parents. He was raised in Minneapolis, MN where he attended the Blake School; he went on to earn a BA and an MBA at Stanford University, graduating in 1953. Subsequently, he joined the Air Force and met Rolleen Taylor in San Antonio TX. They married soon after, lived in Del Rio TX (where their first child, Cynthia was born), moved to Albuquerque NM, and then to Carbondale CO in 1958 where their three sons were born.

The Stricker family lived on the banks of the Crystal River fly fishing, raising animals, and spending their summers backpacking in the Rockies and the Canyonlands of Utah. As the family was sitting around a campfire under a mountain peak somewhere, George was known to ask the rhetorical question, “Where would you rather be?”.

George worked as the business manager and taught history at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School and later became the Director of Adult Education at the newly founded Colorado Mountain College. The family moved to Gig Harbor WA in 1975 where George ran the adult education program at the University of Puget Sound.

In 1980, his career track took a radical turn into the wind energy field. George was intrigued by renewable energy and became a self-taught developer which took him to Colorado, Hawaii, the Cook Islands, India, China, and various parts of California. George explored the world, living in Europe, Seattle, Palm Springs, and Tehachapi.

In 1995, George retired from the wind business and moved to South Lake Tahoe CA where his son, Brian lived. Not content with golf or taking cruises, he bought a lodge on 20 acres of forest land in the Hope Valley surrounded by the high Sierras, and created a retreat center. During the seven years he owned the property, he hosted numerous weddings, mediation retreats, and sweat lodge ceremonies. In 2006, George moved to the Chesapeake Bay where he bought a house on a small inlet. In 2011, he moved to Austin TX to be close to Cynthia and Scott. Not one to sit idle, George became a volunteer at Barton Hills Elementary School, mentored a boy, and volunteered with Hospice Austin to help terminally-ill people navigate the dying process.

George was an empathic listener and an incorrigible story-teller who always had a joke or a pun available for his captive audience. He was a master at helping others feel loved and cared for and lived true to his mantra, “KEEP SMILING”.

In his own words, George said, “If I am remembered very long, maybe it will be for something I represented rather than for my character or personality, something like: ‘Here’s lies a kind person’, or ‘George always tried to help,’ or ‘The world would be better off if more were like him’, or some similar sort of epitaph. My writing will not be published. My art will not be collected. My woodwork will crumble. But maybe my smile will be passed on and light the eyes of others… Maybe the children I knew will become doctors, professors, clergy-persons, inventors, artists, statesmen, or others who can nudge civilization along an evolutionary path toward greatness. Who could ask for more?”

The family is eternally grateful to the staff of Barton Hills Assisted Living. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice Austin.

May 27, 1936 - March 20, 2018

Mary Beil Gerdeman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the daughter of Elizabeth Lee Beil and Wallace Beil, an ophthalmologist. Mary’s early childhood with her older sister, Betty, was spent in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her favorite memories of this time are from Mississippi where her family bought their first horses and learned horsemanship while riding near a family cottage.

As a teenager, Mary moved to Upper Gallinas Canyon near Montezuma, New Mexico where her parents bought a mountain ranch for Tennessee Walkers and Morgan horses. Mary and her sister, Judy, rode often through the Sangre de Cristo mountains while living on the Lazy B Ranch, later renamed El Porvenir Ranch. Mary attended school in nearby Las Vegas. Her senior year, Mary and her horse moved to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado where she was one of 2 members of the inaugural graduating class in 1954. Her younger sister, Judy, graduated from CRMS as well eight years later.

While attending Highland College in Las Vegas, she met her husband, James Gerdeman. She married Jimmy in 1958, and the couple moved to Austin where she completed her BA in German and Jimmy completed his law degree at the University of Texas. Following graduation, the two moved to Lubbock, Texas where they raised their three daughters. Jimmy ran a law practice and Mary worked for him as a legal secretary. When their daughters were older, Mary accepted a job as a secretary at Texas Tech University.

After Mary and Jimmy divorced in 1981, she started a career in Medical Records. She attended South Plains College and earned an Accredited Records Technician certificate in 1985. She returned to Texas Tech as a medical transcriptionist until her retirement in 1999.

In Lubbock, Mary enjoyed museums, the symphony, weaving, and Texas Tech football. As some of her long-time friends left the area, she considered a move to be closer to family.

In 2004, Mary moved to San Diego near her daughter Amanda’s family. She lived in the Seven Oaks Community of Rancho Bernardo and was an active participant with the RB Travel Club, the Continuing Education Center, and the Daytrippers. With travel club friends, she saw sights across California and traveled to Alaska, New England, Hawaii and Nashville. She loved books, chamber music, opera, and the symphony as well as the San Diego Museum of Art.

Since March 2017, Mary has enjoyed life with new friends at the Belmont Village where she was a regular at the musical performances, trivia, word games, and lectures.
November 28, 1955 - December 21, 2017

Christopher Wylie Link son of M.P. Link Jr. and Elizabeth C. Link.

Chris is survived by his sons, Marshall Link and Tucker Link; their mother Amy Link; his brother Douglas Link; his nieces, Mona Ohmart and Jennifer Link; nephew, Peter Link; grandnephew, Gus Colby and grand nieces, Faith Ohmart and Lena Colby.

Chris was a farmer, carpenter, cabinet and furniture maker, real estate agent, musician, and guitar collector extraordinaire. He was a man of many talents and interests; a student of history, language, culture, and human nature; a lover of books, animals, and the great outdoors. He was an avid camper, hiker, and supporter of environmental organizations.

Christopher will be sorely missed by his family and long-time wide circle of friends. His empathy, compassion, and sparkling sense of humor, along with his razor-sharp intellect, will not be forgotten.
April 18, 1933 - November 10, 2017

Ed Rubovits died unexpectedly the morning of November 10. He was sitting in the sunshine on the portal of his Santa Fe home, having just split a few logs. His wife of 53 years was with him. Ed had retired from a long career in education which included years of serving as headmaster of the Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale, Colorado, the Verde Valley School in Sedona, Arizona and as head of the upper school of Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon. He was a strong advocate of outdoor and experiential education, and he was an early supporter and organizer of the Portland chapter of Amigos de las Americas. Known for his wry sense of humor, his leadership style often brought perspective to difficult situations. Ed was happiest when he was skiing, hiking, and camping in the mountains or on his bike. In recent years he focused his love of the out of doors on cycling. He enjoyed many tours with Cycle Oregon and participating in school bike trips with students and colleagues. His idea of how to kick off retirement was the solo bicycle trip he took from Missoula, Montana to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Many years ago his infectious biking enthusiasm spread to his wife and his two small sons during a year they spent in France exploring the French countryside on their bicycles. Following his retirement in the mid-'90's Ed and Nancy discovered the Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route across Spain, and they developed an ongoing attachment to it. They made four trips to the Camino and were fortunate to travel the 500-mile route both on bikes and on foot and to spend time in a pilgrims' refuge as volunteer hospitaleros greeting and hosting others traveling the route. Ed's passing leaves uncountable friends and family who will miss him dearly. He is survived by his wife, Nancy and sons, Michael and David Rubovits and their spouses, Bronwen Lodato and Piper Davis, and by Ed's beloved granddaughter, Una Rubovits. He is also survived by his brother-in-law and sister-in-law Rick and Marilyn Hyde and by his nephew and nieces, Jeff, Katie, and Kristen Hyde. Ed said more than once, "we have had wonderful adventures and great good fortune." Donations to his memory may be made to the Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Carbondale, Colorado.
July 10, 1944 — October 30, 2017

She is survived by her husband of 32 years, Mark Luttrell; her sons Adam Infascelli of Glenwood Springs and Aaron Luttrell of Carbondale; her two sisters Janice Nuckols of Kaneohe, Hawaii, and Nora Nuckols of Vancouver, British Columbia; her two aunts and an uncle in Willimantic, Conn.; nieces, nephews and cousins; as well as many, many good friends.

Maureen was born in Kingsville, Texas, went to high school in Marietta, Ohio, and earned her R.N. from Good Samaritan Hospital in Zanesville, Ohio. She then went on to earn a B.S.N. from the University of Cincinnati and an M.S.N. from the University of Massachusetts. She moved from Boston to Glenwood Springs with her then-husband Joe Infascelli and began nursing at Valley View Hospital in 1975. She moved to Carbondale for the first time to become the residential school nurse and health educator for Colorado Rocky Mountain School.

Maureen later attended the University of Denver, where she earned her master's degree in counseling before returning to Carbondale, where she established her own counseling practice. She then worked a stint at the Advocate Safehouse in Glenwood Springs before Maureen began teaching nursing at Colorado Mountain College. She retired as a professor of nursing in 2011, although she continued to teach clinical and skills labs as adjunct faculty until 2014.

Maureen was committed to the Roaring Fork Women's Triathlon team for 18 years, serving as a coach in various roles, and was just named coach emeritus this summer. She competed Aug. 4, 2017, in the Tri For The Cure in Denver, finishing with her best time in three years. She was also a member of the Tri-Glenwood 30-year club.

After her multiple myeloma diagnosis seven years ago, she was a vibrant member of the Cancer Coffee Walk & Talk group at Valley View Hospital. Maureen loved to give back to the community, most recently serving as a volunteer with the Rosiebelle Art Project, as well as the Carbondale Library Wednesday after-school art program. She was an annual volunteer at Carbondale Mountain Fair as the pie judge, always in a memorable costume. She was also very active in the Carbondale Methodist Church. She provided babysitting, dogsitting and respite care for many of her friends.

Essentially, wherever there was a need, Maureen was there. Maureen was loved and will be remembered by many. She spent 30 years as a volunteer fireman and EMT for the Carbondale Fire Department, so a celebration of her life was held at the firehouse on Sunday, Dec. 3.
February 12, 1990 - October 8, 2017

Having lived for 27 years with the great joy and spirit that was Hayden Kennedy, we share the loss of our son and his partner Inge Perkins as the result of an avalanche in the southern Madison Mountains near Bozeman, Montana, on October 7th.

Inge Perkin’s body was recovered by the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center at the base of Mt. Imp on October 9th. Hayden survived the avalanche but not the unbearable loss of his partner in life. He chose to end his life. Myself and his mother Julie sorrowfully respect his decision.

Hayden truly was an uncensored soul whose accomplishments as a mountaineer were always secondary to his deep friendships and mindfulness.

He recently moved to Bozeman to work on his EMT certification while Inge completed her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and education at Montana State University.

“Over the last few years, however, as I’ve watched too many friends go to the mountains only to never return, I’ve realized something painful,” wrote Hayden in Evening Sends just last month. “It’s not just the memorable summits and crux moves that are fleeting. Friends and climbing partners are fleeting, too. This is the painful reality of our sport, and I’m unsure what to make of it. Climbing is either a beautiful gift or a curse.”
June 6, 1940 - August 25, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017
September 14, 1972 - May 10, 2017

Don Harvey passed away peacefully May 5, 2017, at his home surrounded by family. Don was born in Montreal, Canada and was raised in Spokane, Washington. He graduated from Whitman College and then went to McGill University in Montreal for medical school, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. Don performed his residency at Southern Pacific Hospital in San Francisco where he chose the specialty of Urology.

Don met the love of his life, Jane Mildred Hasfurther, in first grade. They dated through high school and college and were married in 1955. Don and Jane chose to live in Lucas Valley, California, which provided an ideal setting to raise their four boys. They had a rich and full life together, enjoying sailing on the San Francisco Bay, traveling with friends, and family vacations. Every year the family had wonderful vacations at the beach in Bolinas, on the delta at Tinsley Island and, of course, at their beloved Spirit Lake in Idaho. Five generations of Harveys have vacationed at Spirit Lake. Don and Jane spent six months at the lake every year after Don's retirement in 1999.

Don had a distinguished career in medicine. He was a fine surgeon who truly cared about his patients. He enjoyed getting to know them as people and learning about their families and lives. Don served as President of the Marin Medical Society and Commodore of the San Francisco Yacht Club.

Don loved his projects. He restored nautical antiques and wooden speedboats. But his favorite project was expanding the cabins at Spirit Lake so all his children and grandchildren could gather together every summer.

Don is survived by his wife Jane, sons David, Kent, Philip, and Peter and 10 grandchildren.

Published in Spokesman-Review on May 21, 2017
May 13, 1937 - January 21, 2017

Tony Perry died Jan. 21 peacefully in his beloved Colorado home in the arms of his loving family.

To find words to summarize Tony's life is daunting, as he accomplished so much. He was a complex man, memorable and loved.

He was born May 13, 1937, in Greenwich, Connecticut, the son of Margaret and Parker Perry, and spent his early years in Stowe and Manchester, Vermont. He followed his heart to the mountains of Colorado at 16 to a newly organized Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale. This environment nurtured his independent, adventuresome character, where he worked, skied, traveled and earned a ski scholarship to The University of Denver, excelling at athletics and hotel management. He struggled with dyslexia and became very adept at recognizing the skills he lacked, surrounding himself with capable people to help him accomplish his goals. He went on to help others with this affliction to follow a successful path.

A born entrepreneur, his charm, and interest in people drew him to the hospitality business soon after college. After a short stint in the Colorado National Guard, he opened nightclubs in New York, Stowe and Manchester, Vermont, and later turned his attention to the restaurant business. The Sirloin Saloons, Dakotas, Sweetwaters, Perry's Fish House - all institutions representing beauty, fun, great food and lasting memories for the millions who entered their doors.

During the four decades that he ran his many restaurants throughout the Northeast, he employed thousands of people through The Perry Restaurant Group and evolved a management style that was years ahead of its time. He took a deep and abiding interest in the people he worked with, recognizing that by giving them the opportunity to grow and succeed as individuals, their contribution to the business would develop. He put in place an employee stock ownership plan in the 1980s where all employees could benefit; he sent people on courses that helped them empower their lives rather than just their jobs, and he developed an inclusive style of management that engendered immense loyalty to this day.

He supported generously many causes close to his heart - he educated countless children, supported green start-ups, wildlife conservation, The Vermont Land Trust, Nature's Conservancy, music and the arts.

He was a born seeker and adventurer, traveling to over 50 countries, often bringing along his friends and family to share his experiences. He heli-skied throughout the Canadian Rockies, he was an avid fisherman and hunter, at home in the woods as anywhere. He raised a herd of majestic buffalo on his hilltop farm in Vermont with sweeping views of Lake Champlain from his rustic log cabin he built around an apple tree.

He amassed a matrix of friends as diverse as his interests, most who he remained connected to throughout his life. He had a genuine and lasting impact on so many, freely giving love, support and confidence where he felt he was needed. So many thought of him as their best friend.

Tony was profoundly connected to nature and beauty. His love and appreciation of the Native American culture and art form was a passion that brought him endless pleasure.

He was tireless in his quest for the meaning of life, periodically trading his business work for his spiritual journey, moving to an ashram for a time to find fulfillment and love. His pursuit led him to his soul mate, and he and Teri were married in 1995.

For 22 years, they traveled and skied and fly-fished around the world. They built wonderful homes in Colorado, Mexico, and Nantucket, and mostly they enjoyed their transcendent love for each other every day.

His sanctuary was his Colorado mountain ranch, high in the wildflowers, where he built his "Stonehenge" as a legacy. However, his true legacy will last for eternity in the lives that have been altered by his love.

Tony was spiritual, funny, loving and so immeasurably generous.

He lived and died with unequaled courage undaunted by his illnesses, and full of gratitude.

He leaves behind a world enriched by his presence. He is survived by his sister, Judy Perry Rowe, and his nieces, Wendy, Jane and Jenny, his stepson Kenan, Miya and his wonderful grandchildren, Jack, Eliza and Sebastian, who brought special joy to his later years. His extended family is too numerous to mention, but no less important - forever connected in love. Not left behind, but traveling beside him for eternity is his adoring wife, Teri Giguere Perry.

Please honor nature in memory of Tony. We have set up a website online at www.tonyperry.life to share memories, photos, and information about his services.
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