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Home Blog Spring reading list from the Head of School

Spring reading list from the Head of School

By Jeff Leahy, Head of School 04/19/2019
Here's the latest installment of what CRMS Head of School, Jeff Leahy, has been reading this winter and early spring.

David Goggins: Can’t Hurt Me, Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds. Goggins successfully illustrates that our most significant limitations are within our minds. Through focus, determination, hard work, and just plain old effort, Goggins achieves more, tolerates more, and overcomes more than any other person we know. If you have read Living with a SEAL, one of my most gifted books, then you already know about Goggins and how different he is from the norm. This book takes you deeper into how he become the person featured in that book, and if it doesn’t make you want to go out and run an ultra-marathon, then you don’t have a heartbeat.

W. Timothy Gallwey: The Inner Game of Tennis, The Classic Guide to the Mental Side of Peak Performance. Gallwey is way before his time when he originally wrote this book in 1974. Of course, it is not a book about tennis, but rather it is about our approach to anything that we do in life. Gallwey is clear, insightful and reveals for us the “game” that we are playing between an inner and outer self. This book is full of little jewels and worth your time. I highly recommend it.

Jasmyn Ward: Sing, Unburied, Sing. This book was recommended to me by our recent hire in the English department. Ward is a National Book Award-winning author, and this novel uses multiple narrative perspectives on a family’s road trip to pick up the father who is being released from prison. Along the way, we learn about the family’s gifts, losses, and connection to the world of the living and the dead. Not a book that I would recommend as a beach read, but if you are looking for a narrative scope with an incredibly powerful ending, this book is for you. Keep in mind; I tend to like National Book Award winners and finalists.

Colm Toibin: Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know: The Fathers of Wilde, Yeats, and Joyce. I have enjoyed Toibin’s fiction over the years, and with this book, he turns his attention to the fathers of three Irish heavyweights. This is a non-fiction piece that will capture the attention of someone who loves these authors, but – and perhaps I am unfair here – I don’t believe it will be of too much interest to just about everyone else. If you are looking for a piece of fiction from Toibin, I would recommend The Master.

Roy Wake: Bedales School: The First 100 Years. Greg and Carolyn Williams, current parents, were recently in London and made their way onto the Bedales School campus. If you are interested in the history of the progressive movement outside the U.S., this is an engaging read. Founded just before the turn of the 20th century, Bedales School survives two world wars and the financial chaos of the depression-era to emerge as one of the most notable schools in England.

Ted Koppel: Lights Out. When I was growing up the major fear was a nuclear war, and then more recently, the notion of “dirty bombs.” Koppel makes the case that we really should be concerned about a “cyber attack” and that we are entirely unprepared for such an event. An attack of this nature on the nation could result in months without running water, electricity (light, refrigeration, electric stoves) and standard forms of communication. Current faculty member Jim Gaw recommended this read for me, and I guess if you are part of the “prepper movement” or want to be inspired to join, this book is for you.
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Home Blog Spring reading list from the Head of School

Spring reading list from the Head of School

By Jeff Leahy, Head of School 04/19/2019
Here's the latest installment of what CRMS Head of School, Jeff Leahy, has been reading this winter and early spring.

David Goggins: Can’t Hurt Me, Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds. Goggins successfully illustrates that our most significant limitations are within our minds. Through focus, determination, hard work, and just plain old effort, Goggins achieves more, tolerates more, and overcomes more than any other person we know. If you have read Living with a SEAL, one of my most gifted books, then you already know about Goggins and how different he is from the norm. This book takes you deeper into how he become the person featured in that book, and if it doesn’t make you want to go out and run an ultra-marathon, then you don’t have a heartbeat.

W. Timothy Gallwey: The Inner Game of Tennis, The Classic Guide to the Mental Side of Peak Performance. Gallwey is way before his time when he originally wrote this book in 1974. Of course, it is not a book about tennis, but rather it is about our approach to anything that we do in life. Gallwey is clear, insightful and reveals for us the “game” that we are playing between an inner and outer self. This book is full of little jewels and worth your time. I highly recommend it.

Jasmyn Ward: Sing, Unburied, Sing. This book was recommended to me by our recent hire in the English department. Ward is a National Book Award-winning author, and this novel uses multiple narrative perspectives on a family’s road trip to pick up the father who is being released from prison. Along the way, we learn about the family’s gifts, losses, and connection to the world of the living and the dead. Not a book that I would recommend as a beach read, but if you are looking for a narrative scope with an incredibly powerful ending, this book is for you. Keep in mind; I tend to like National Book Award winners and finalists.

Colm Toibin: Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know: The Fathers of Wilde, Yeats, and Joyce. I have enjoyed Toibin’s fiction over the years, and with this book, he turns his attention to the fathers of three Irish heavyweights. This is a non-fiction piece that will capture the attention of someone who loves these authors, but – and perhaps I am unfair here – I don’t believe it will be of too much interest to just about everyone else. If you are looking for a piece of fiction from Toibin, I would recommend The Master.

Roy Wake: Bedales School: The First 100 Years. Greg and Carolyn Williams, current parents, were recently in London and made their way onto the Bedales School campus. If you are interested in the history of the progressive movement outside the U.S., this is an engaging read. Founded just before the turn of the 20th century, Bedales School survives two world wars and the financial chaos of the depression-era to emerge as one of the most notable schools in England.

Ted Koppel: Lights Out. When I was growing up the major fear was a nuclear war, and then more recently, the notion of “dirty bombs.” Koppel makes the case that we really should be concerned about a “cyber attack” and that we are entirely unprepared for such an event. An attack of this nature on the nation could result in months without running water, electricity (light, refrigeration, electric stoves) and standard forms of communication. Current faculty member Jim Gaw recommended this read for me, and I guess if you are part of the “prepper movement” or want to be inspired to join, this book is for you.
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