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Home Academics Science

Science

The CRMS Science Department emphasizes experiential investigation of the natural world. Students explore the nature of scientific inquiry and examine the function of models in scientific understanding. CRMS students use scientific methods to investigate and verify fundamental principles. They utilize computers, library resources, electronic probes, and mathematics to evaluate, quantify, and present their research. Finally, faculty encourage students to become critical thinkers and citizens who use the content, models, and skills of science throughout their lives. Students start with Biology, followed by Chemistry. They are encouraged to continue with other science courses throughout their years of study here.

Biology
Biology is an introduction to life on earth. In CRMS’s first science course, students explore the rationale, logic, and assumptions of the scientific method, scientific inquiry, and scientific research and reporting. In the first semester, students study principles of populations, ecosystems, evolution, taxonomy and systematics, biochemistry, cells and cell division, photosynthesis, and metabolism. In the second semester, students investigate principles of genetics, infectious disease and the immune system, and human anatomy and physiology, including the endocrine system, reproduction, growth and development, neurobiology, and cardiopulmonary and skeletomuscular systems.

Chemistry
The composition and behavior of matter in all its phases is the focus of this course. Topics include the distinction between metals and nonmetals, bonding, the periodic table, basic types of chemical reactions, gas laws, the mole and stoichiometry, organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, solution (acid/base and redox) chemistry, and energy changes. Studies emphasize qualitative and quantitative lab work, critical analysis of experimental results, and use of abstract models as a basis of explanation.

Geology
The geology of Carbondale and its surroundings is the focus of the fall semester. Field trips highlight more than two billion years of geologic history, including the origin of the Rocky Mountains, eruption of volcanoes, glaciations, development of the Colorado River system, and evidence for ancient rivers, lakes, deserts, coal swamps, beaches, and oceans. The second semester is global in scope, including topics such as Earth’s climate, meteorology, plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, hydrology, and environmental and natural-resource issues.
Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites.

Physics
Physics is an investigation of fundamental natural phenomena expressed through the language of mathematics. The development and experimental verification of physical theory is an integral part of the course. Topics include the description of motion and its causes as seen through the models of classical mechanics, the properties and behavior of light, and the quantum mechanical model of the atom. The notion of models as a description of the physical world leads to the discussion of the nature of knowledge and humanity’s understanding of the world.
Algebra 2, Biology, and Chemistry are prerequisites.

AP Environmental Science
The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a college-level environmental science course. The class will explore the concepts of ecological interdependence, population dynamics, and geological processes. The course focuses on the skills and concepts needed to identify, assess, and resolve environmental problems at a local, regional, national, and global level. Field and laboratory work allow for first-hand observation and analysis of environmental phenomena.
Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites.

Academics

Home Academics Science

Science

The CRMS Science Department emphasizes experiential investigation of the natural world. Students explore the nature of scientific inquiry and examine the function of models in scientific understanding. CRMS students use scientific methods to investigate and verify fundamental principles. They utilize computers, library resources, electronic probes, and mathematics to evaluate, quantify, and present their research. Finally, faculty encourage students to become critical thinkers and citizens who use the content, models, and skills of science throughout their lives. Students start with Biology, followed by Chemistry. They are encouraged to continue with other science courses throughout their years of study here.

Biology
Biology is an introduction to life on earth. In CRMS’s first science course, students explore the rationale, logic, and assumptions of the scientific method, scientific inquiry, and scientific research and reporting. In the first semester, students study principles of populations, ecosystems, evolution, taxonomy and systematics, biochemistry, cells and cell division, photosynthesis, and metabolism. In the second semester, students investigate principles of genetics, infectious disease and the immune system, and human anatomy and physiology, including the endocrine system, reproduction, growth and development, neurobiology, and cardiopulmonary and skeletomuscular systems.

Chemistry
The composition and behavior of matter in all its phases is the focus of this course. Topics include the distinction between metals and nonmetals, bonding, the periodic table, basic types of chemical reactions, gas laws, the mole and stoichiometry, organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, solution (acid/base and redox) chemistry, and energy changes. Studies emphasize qualitative and quantitative lab work, critical analysis of experimental results, and use of abstract models as a basis of explanation.

Geology
The geology of Carbondale and its surroundings is the focus of the fall semester. Field trips highlight more than two billion years of geologic history, including the origin of the Rocky Mountains, eruption of volcanoes, glaciations, development of the Colorado River system, and evidence for ancient rivers, lakes, deserts, coal swamps, beaches, and oceans. The second semester is global in scope, including topics such as Earth’s climate, meteorology, plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, hydrology, and environmental and natural-resource issues.
Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites.

Physics
Physics is an investigation of fundamental natural phenomena expressed through the language of mathematics. The development and experimental verification of physical theory is an integral part of the course. Topics include the description of motion and its causes as seen through the models of classical mechanics, the properties and behavior of light, and the quantum mechanical model of the atom. The notion of models as a description of the physical world leads to the discussion of the nature of knowledge and humanity’s understanding of the world.
Algebra 2, Biology, and Chemistry are prerequisites.

AP Environmental Science
The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a college-level environmental science course. The class will explore the concepts of ecological interdependence, population dynamics, and geological processes. The course focuses on the skills and concepts needed to identify, assess, and resolve environmental problems at a local, regional, national, and global level. Field and laboratory work allow for first-hand observation and analysis of environmental phenomena.
Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites.
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CRMS
500 Holden Way
Carbondale, CO 81623
admission@crms.org
970.963.2562
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