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Home Academics AP Courses

AP Courses

AP U.S. History
This course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students will learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. AP U.S. History will thus develop in students the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions by an informed judgment and to give reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. (Adapted from The College Board Advanced Placement Program.) Taking the advanced placement test is required. Students should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.


AP English Literature
AP English Literature engages students in careful reading and critical analysis of literature from a wide array of literary genres. Without question, the course sets and maintains a challenging pace that mirrors a college-level syllabus and is geared for both enrichment and preparation for the AP exam. In spite of the pace, students are expected to read deliberately and thoroughly, taking the time necessary to understand a selection’s literary complexities fully. The method for the approach to learning at the AP level includes the experience, interpretation, and evaluation of literature. The readings are selected from the 16th through the 20th century, and with each text, students read a variety of criticism and compose timed AP writing samples graded on the AP scale. Additional evaluations include periodic AP multiple-choice tests, reading quizzes, objective tests, and term papers. This course is offered to juniors as an alternative curriculum to the American Literature course and thus focuses heavily on the American texts suggested by the AP board. Additional non-American texts are used to supplement. Texts may include Hamlet, Oedipus, Walden, Leaves of Grass, The Scarlet Letter, The Wasteland, and others. Students should seek a teacher recommendation before entering this course.


AP Calculus AB
This course is centered on the four central concepts to be mastered in the first-semester college course in calculus: limit, derivative, definite integral, and indefinite integral. For each idea, students are asked to know the precise definition and be able to apply the concept and its associated skills to a variety of unique problems. There are three ways these concepts are presented to the student: graphically, algebraically, and verbally. Students may earn college credit through successful performance on the Calculus AB Advanced Placement examination.
Prerequisite: Precalculus


AP Calculus BC
This course serves as either an advanced first-year calculus course or as an extension of AP Calculus AB. First-year calculus students will be placed in AP Calculus BC vs. AP Calculus AB based on their interest, performance in Precalculus, and teacher recommendation. The course continues to emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus. Topics covered include more sophisticated methods of integration, polar and parametric curves, polynomial approximations and infinite series, and vector-valued functions. Students may earn college credit through successful performance on the Calculus BC Advanced Placement examination.


AP Environmental Science
The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a college-level environmental science course. The class will explore the concepts of ecological interdependence, population dynamics, and geological processes. The course focuses on the skills and concepts needed to identify, assess, and resolve environmental problems at a local, regional, national, and global level. Field and laboratory work allow for first-hand observation and analysis of environmental phenomena.
Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites.

Academics

Home Academics AP Courses

AP Courses

AP U.S. History
This course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students will learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. AP U.S. History will thus develop in students the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions by an informed judgment and to give reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. (Adapted from The College Board Advanced Placement Program.) Taking the advanced placement test is required. Students should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.


AP English Literature
AP English Literature engages students in careful reading and critical analysis of literature from a wide array of literary genres. Without question, the course sets and maintains a challenging pace that mirrors a college-level syllabus and is geared for both enrichment and preparation for the AP exam. In spite of the pace, students are expected to read deliberately and thoroughly, taking the time necessary to understand a selection’s literary complexities fully. The method for the approach to learning at the AP level includes the experience, interpretation, and evaluation of literature. The readings are selected from the 16th through the 20th century, and with each text, students read a variety of criticism and compose timed AP writing samples graded on the AP scale. Additional evaluations include periodic AP multiple-choice tests, reading quizzes, objective tests, and term papers. This course is offered to juniors as an alternative curriculum to the American Literature course and thus focuses heavily on the American texts suggested by the AP board. Additional non-American texts are used to supplement. Texts may include Hamlet, Oedipus, Walden, Leaves of Grass, The Scarlet Letter, The Wasteland, and others. Students should seek a teacher recommendation before entering this course.


AP Calculus AB
This course is centered on the four central concepts to be mastered in the first-semester college course in calculus: limit, derivative, definite integral, and indefinite integral. For each idea, students are asked to know the precise definition and be able to apply the concept and its associated skills to a variety of unique problems. There are three ways these concepts are presented to the student: graphically, algebraically, and verbally. Students may earn college credit through successful performance on the Calculus AB Advanced Placement examination.
Prerequisite: Precalculus


AP Calculus BC
This course serves as either an advanced first-year calculus course or as an extension of AP Calculus AB. First-year calculus students will be placed in AP Calculus BC vs. AP Calculus AB based on their interest, performance in Precalculus, and teacher recommendation. The course continues to emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus. Topics covered include more sophisticated methods of integration, polar and parametric curves, polynomial approximations and infinite series, and vector-valued functions. Students may earn college credit through successful performance on the Calculus BC Advanced Placement examination.


AP Environmental Science
The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a college-level environmental science course. The class will explore the concepts of ecological interdependence, population dynamics, and geological processes. The course focuses on the skills and concepts needed to identify, assess, and resolve environmental problems at a local, regional, national, and global level. Field and laboratory work allow for first-hand observation and analysis of environmental phenomena.
Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites.
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